Film/TV clichés

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Doom Patrol
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Doom Patrol »

Tyres always screech in multi story or underground car parks.

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Simon36
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Post by Simon36 »

Chairs always used to break over the backs of people who very patiently stayed on all fours waiting for the moment of impact during a fight scene too.

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penfold
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Post by penfold »

marsey wrote:Hitting someone over the head with a glass bottle always causes the bottle to break. This would never happen in real life.
Kudos then to S2 Ep1 of In The Line Of Duty, last week, wherein Keeley Hawes whacked a neighbour unconscious and then disposed of the intact empty wine bottle.....

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Post by Mike S »

Criminal checks into seedy motel wearing unconvincing wig. Receptionist spots criminal's photo on front page of newspaper. Receptionist grabs phone. Criminal puts hand over dial, saying 'I wouldn't do that if I were you.'

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by ray lomas »

People ending telephone conversations by simply replacing the receiver, without so much as a "bye", "thanks", "Cheers, then" etc. - in the real world this would be seen as quite rude yet it seems to be considered acceptable on the telly and in films, regardless of whether the character is in any way annoyed/frustrated or not.

Jack Regan does it all the time in The Sweeney.

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Post by ctraynor »

That's a good one. Cmdr Straker etc in UFO. Be good if sometimes a character didn't want to seem rude and said bye, yeah bye, ok then bye, a few times. The only time I recall anything like that was in Sean's Show - "Bye bye Mrs Pebbles, bye bye..."

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Post by Mike S »

If a doorbell rings in the middle of the night, the main character must rush downstairs, muttering 'Who on earth can this be?' while hurriedly putting on his slippers and dressing gown. Rather than doing what most sensible people would do, which is think 'No fear, I've seen Clockwork Orange' and stay in bed.

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Mickey
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Post by Mickey »

And if you really must answer the door, for heavens sakes don't formally invite them in. Why is it only people in horror films who have never read a vampire story?! Why yes, tall, dark stranger on my doorstep at midnight. Please do come inside, I should love to be eaten.

One thing that always annoys me about police dramas is that anybody being interviewed in their own home always bustles about watering plants or making tea. Sit still, for goodness sakes. It's allowed. And a lot more polite.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Clive »

I have always wondered if it is a film cliche or if at one time it was common to welcome a guest to your house by offering them a gin and tonic and the like. Also having fully stocked cocktail cabinets with decanters and soda fountains. I don't think I have ever visited someone who offered me a Whiskey on the rocks as a way of a greeting, or perhaps I don't move in those circles.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by videoking »

When I was a kid and was watching the second year of Space 1999 my mother made the point of letting me know that Tony Anholt used the world "hell" ...well.......a hell of a lot.....

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Simon36
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon36 »

ray lomas wrote:People ending telephone conversations by simply replacing the receiver, without so much as a "bye", "thanks", "Cheers, then" etc. - in the real world this would be seen as quite rude yet it seems to be considered acceptable on the telly and in films, regardless of whether the character is in any way annoyed/frustrated or not.

Jack Regan does it all the time in The Sweeney.
Yes I was going to mention this. I'd imagine with Thaw it was deliberately part of the character but tv has been rife with manners like that, it's true.

Characters switching on the news and seeing the relevant item straight away was something forever happening on old telly. And soap operas to this day manage to have characters deaf to the sound of the front door closing and their wife/ husband entering to catch them in someone else's arms.

Storylines always come to a head at a party in EastEnders, which was an effective tactic the first time but has gone beyond ludicrous now.

Similarly in soaps, people think nothing of having a domestic in a packed pub as everyone falls silent around them.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by squidney »

What about in soaps generally speaking, where you don't normally hear any traffic sounds, aircraft overhead etc during a scene set in a front room for example ...very effective double glazing presumably, but if all of a sudden you can hear say a car pulling up outside, then it will certainly be part of the plotline.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by marsey »

In tv/films, outer space is a pretty noisy place to be. Spaceship engines , lasers, things hitting the sides of ships etc. all tend to make lots of noise, when of course it should all be silence. Doesn't make for good tv of course.

Not the case these days (and even sometimes parodied) but back in the day, anyone sporting a goatee was a bad guy/evil, Spock being a classic example .

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mark Dowding »

There's always somewhere to park outside the building that our hero wants to go to with plenty of space just to pull up and get out without any Reginald Molehusband style reverse parking or going round the block a couple of times until someone vacates a space.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by smorodina »

A character has discovered a fact or item that is crucial to the case and shows it to his boss. Boss says 'You haven't told anybody else have you?' and promptly destroys the evidence (or sometimes the character). Last saw this one in 'The Hour'. Bolt cutters - which never fail to cut the most stubborn of bolts or torture victim fingers, suddenly fail to work when the hand in the vice belongs to one of the starring characters.
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Post by Mike S »

You can destroy an incriminating piece of paper by cleverly tearing it in two and hiding it behind a cushion.

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Post by Mike S »

Clive wrote:I have always wondered if it is a film cliche or if at one time it was common to welcome a guest to your house by offering them a gin and tonic and the like. Also having fully stocked cocktail cabinets with decanters and soda fountains. I don't think I have ever visited someone who offered me a Whiskey on the rocks as a way of a greeting, or perhaps I don't move in those circles.
I've always wanted a 'drink zone', like Paul Eddington in The Good Life, but I've never had the money or will power to sustain one.

'Can I get you a drink?' Whatever the request, the response will never be 'Um, sorry, we haven't got that'. You could ask for a Midori and slimline bitters with a creme de lychee chaser and Mr Middle-Class 70s Dad Character would have it.

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Mickey
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Post by Mickey »

Mike S wrote:You can destroy an incriminating piece of paper by cleverly tearing it in two and hiding it behind a cushion.
It's remarkable how many people on TV think that if you drop something into a wastepaper basket, it ceases to exist.

Another thing that's brilliant at disappearing without trace is a dead body. If you find a dead body (or some other piece of fabulously incriminating evidence), you have to rush off and find somebody to come back and look at it with you. You can't take the evidence to them, that would be cheating. When you return with your witness, the dead body/fabulous piece of evidence will have gone. Every time. I'm sure it was shocking once, but it ceased to be that a long time ago.

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Post by Mark Dowding »

A single match will illuminate every corner of a room the size of a warehouse. Switching the bedroom light off will cause a blue light to come on and make the room brighter - how they get to sleep is anyone's guess but they spend the night talking anyway. If you live in sitcomville then your lounge will probably be split level with dining area on the higher level.

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Mike S wrote:'Can I get you a drink?' Whatever the request, the response will never be 'Um, sorry, we haven't got that'.
Wodehouse Playhouse S2E3. And it was even at a bar.

Either that, or they had what he asked but didn't want to give it to him. Are you familiar with that?
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Post by ctraynor »

marsey wrote:In tv/films, outer space is a pretty noisy place to be. Spaceship engines , lasers, things hitting the sides of ships etc. all tend to make lots of noise, when of course it should all be silence. Doesn't make for good tv of course.

Not the case these days (and even sometimes parodied) but back in the day, anyone sporting a goatee was a bad guy/evil, Spock being a classic example .
There was a token effort here and there in UFO with one or two brief shots of the Interceptors heading up from the moon accompanied by just music but no roar of engines. Maybe Moonbase 3 too, although I admit it wasn't a ratings grabber.

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Spiny Norman wrote:
Mike S wrote:'Can I get you a drink?' Whatever the request, the response will never be 'Um, sorry, we haven't got that'.
Wodehouse Playhouse S2E3. And it was even at a bar.

Either that, or they had what he asked but didn't want to give it to him. Are you familiar with that?
At the rugby club where my father is president, for his 80th birthday party:

"What wine have you got?"
"We've got red. Or white."
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

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Post by Ian Wegg »

Controller 2957 wrote:
marsey wrote:Hitting someone over the head with a glass bottle always causes the bottle to break. This would never happen in real life.
On a similar note, a single stab wound or gun shot wound is always not only fatal but INSTANTANEOUSLY so (unless a few poetic or noble final words are required in which case death occurs immediately on completion of said words.)

Also worthy of mention is death after receiving even the lightest of glancing blows from a car.
Alfred Hitchcock tried to show how difficult it is to kill someone with the murder of secret policeman Gromek in Torn Curtain (link). Whilst interesting, it is a long and gory scene which eventually becomes almost comedic. It would be very tedious if all screen deaths were depicted that way, I'm happy to accept some clichés as a shortcut that keeps the action moving.

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Post by ghughesarch »

Any WWII rear-gunner who agrees to one last flight over enemy territory before getting back to his girl and getting married won't live to see his wedding day.

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ghughesarch wrote:Any WWII rear-gunner who agrees to one last flight over enemy territory before getting back to his girl and getting married won't live to see his wedding day.
Or just about anyone who produces a photograph and says, "This is my girl..." for that matter...
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

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Post by Controller 2957 »

ghughesarch wrote:Any WWII rear-gunner who agrees to one last flight over enemy territory before getting back to his girl and getting married won't live to see his wedding day.
Ditto for the cop on his last shift before retirement.
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Post by Spiny Norman »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote:Either that, or they had what he asked but didn't want to give it to him. Are you familiar with that?
At the rugby club where my father is president, for his 80th birthday party:

"What wine have you got?"
"We've got red. Or white."[/quote]You'll have to help me, I don't see what's odd about it. Of course it lacks choices like rose, what country, sweet/dry, grape/blend. But a rugby club is unlikely to be a centre of wine connaisseurs?
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Mark Dowding
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mark Dowding »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote:
Controller 2957 wrote:
marsey wrote:Hitting someone over the head with a glass bottle always causes the bottle to break. This would never happen in real life.
On a similar note, a single stab wound or gun shot wound is always not only fatal but INSTANTANEOUSLY so (unless a few poetic or noble final words are required in which case death occurs immediately on completion of said words.)
Alternatively, if the narrative demands it, such gunshots will only result in a "flesh wound," or otherwise have little effect on the protagonist.
Also worthy of mention is death after receiving even the lightest of glancing blows from a car.
Ditto.
Unless of course you're Sean Connery in "The Untouchables" where you can receive a clip full of bullets from a sub-machine gun, loose 3 pints of blood from the collander that used to be your chest, crawl up half a mile of corridor from the back door to the front room, find the phone and tell the station that you need an elastoplast pronto.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by plasticomo »

Of course there was the classic one in 70s films and dramas which I've never understood, where someone is trying to speak to someone on the telephone, but there doesn't appear to be anyone else on the line. So they frantically start bashing one of the buttons under the receiver up and down quickly and repeatedly whilst trying to establish if there's anyone there by saying Hello, Hello (when we all know all this would do is cut them off) !!

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Post by Ian Wegg »

plasticomo wrote:Of course there was the classic one in 70s films and dramas which I've never understood, where someone is trying to speak to someone on the telephone, but there doesn't appear to be anyone else on the line. So they frantically start bashing one of the buttons under the receiver up and down quickly and repeatedly whilst trying to establish if there's anyone there by saying Hello, Hello (when we all know all this would do is cut them off) !!
There is an historic reason for it. On a manual exchange it results in an indicator flag wobbling up and down at the switchboard, alerting the operator who can intervene to sort out an interrupted call. According to this site the UK telephone network went fully automatic in 1976 so thumping the buttons has had no practical effect since then (although on those old phones it did make you feel better)

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