Film/TV clichés

What's not currently on the box
Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

'I think I will have that drink after all!"'

User avatar
Tim Scrafton
405 lines
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:18 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Tim Scrafton »

Whenever a newspaper is seen on screen, the relevant headline we are supposed to read is stated with an exclamation mark, to scream out a sensational effect. This never happens in real life. Watching the Public Eye episode 'Lifer' tonight it features a newspaper cutting shouting 'Stafford charged - its murder!' always gets my goat to see this happen!!

User avatar
Juswuh
D-MAC
Posts: 525
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 10:04 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Juswuh »

ray lomas wrote:People ending telephone conversations by simply replacing the receiver, without so much as a "bye", "thanks", "Cheers, then" etc.
On American shows people frequently begin phone conversations by barking out their surname, usually when their mobiles ring in mid-scene. Does anyone really do that?

User avatar
Controller 2957
625 lines
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 4:27 pm
Location: Derby, UK
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Controller 2957 »

There's the 'variable threat' scenario usually seen in the SF genre especially in the likes of Star Trek and Doctor Who. For example, in the first Dalek story Ian Chesterton is shot in the legs by a Dalek which runs contrary to Dalek behaviour from then on. People running from the Daleks get shot down dead - full stop... Except for when the plot demands that they don't.
You see, no-one... NO-ONE escapes the new world!!

The Official Timeslip Website
http://www.timeslip.org.uk

User avatar
Mickey
625 lines
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:45 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mickey »

A good cliché, but I'd argue that you're using the wrong example. The Daleks are pretending to be trustworthy in that instance, and with good reason. They weren't fully formed as characters yet either. They do quite a few things differently. It's certainly the case that those higher up the cast list are strangely inclined to get punched rather than shot, though, whilst those lower down just get killed outright.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Tim Scrafton wrote:Whenever a newspaper is seen on screen, the relevant headline we are supposed to read is stated with an exclamation mark, to scream out a sensational effect. This never happens in real life. Watching the Public Eye episode 'Lifer' tonight it features a newspaper cutting shouting 'Stafford charged - its murder!' always gets my goat to see this happen!!
You think? Exclamation marks have always been used in newspaper headlines, although these days they're more likely to be to expressing "would you believe it!?" outrage in the Daily Heil.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

User avatar
Tim Scrafton
405 lines
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:18 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Tim Scrafton »

Hmm, perhaps, not usually about murders and serious current affairs. However I don't read The Daily Mail etc, so maybe I am excluding the nonsense of the red tops. :p

silverking
405 lines
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:34 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by silverking »

Whenever a hero and villain are struggling over a gun (sometimes knife) the gun will go off & the hero will stiffen suddenly as if he is the one who has been shot. He will then step back (or rise, if on the floor) to reveal it is actually the bad guy who has taken the bullet.

User avatar
Simon Coward
D-MAC
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:56 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon Coward »

Tim Scrafton wrote:Watching the Public Eye episode 'Lifer' tonight it features a newspaper cutting shouting 'Stafford charged - its murder!' always gets my goat to see this happen!!
That's terrible - they missed out an apostrophe!
We all have to eat a peck of dirt before we die.

User avatar
Tim Scrafton
405 lines
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:18 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Tim Scrafton »

Simon Coward wrote:
Tim Scrafton wrote:Watching the Public Eye episode 'Lifer' tonight it features a newspaper cutting shouting 'Stafford charged - its murder!' always gets my goat to see this happen!!
That's terrible - they missed out an apostrophe!
Bless, lol!

User avatar
Simon36
HD
Posts: 1103
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:43 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon36 »

When someone is informed by the police of the murder of their loved one, as the police ask "just a few questions", they repeatedly say things like "h is very fond of courgettes... er... he WAS very fond of courgettes."

User avatar
Simon Coward
D-MAC
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:56 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon Coward »

marsey wrote:It's amazing though just how often bottles are broken over people's heads, even in the most serious of films/dramas. Drop a bottle on the floor, and yes it will break; but considering the bluntness of a skull, you are more likely to break the skull before you would ever shatter the bottle.
You may be right, though most floors I've come across have been pretty blunt too.
We all have to eat a peck of dirt before we die.

User avatar
Beaker
625 lines
Posts: 275
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:22 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Beaker »

John Shuttleworth does a brilliant routine on one of his albums about the use of phones in drama programmes, including the staring at the handset after receiving bad news. Once you’ve heard it it is almost impossible to take any on-screen phone-call seriously.
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

Nigel Stapley
625 lines
Posts: 185
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:32 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nigel Stapley »

The L-shaped bed-sheets.

You know, the ones which are in all post-coital bedroom scenes where the protagonists are lying side by side.

The ones which only go up to the bloke's navel, but at the same time reach up to the woman's shoulders.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Nigel Stapley wrote:The L-shaped bed-sheets.

You know, the ones which are in all post-coital bedroom scenes where the protagonists are lying side by side.

The ones which only go up to the bloke's navel, but at the same time reach up to the woman's shoulders.
Or, for that matter, the amount of torrid love-making that goes on with any female party/parties keeping their bra/s on.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

Nigel Stapley
625 lines
Posts: 185
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:32 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nigel Stapley »

Oh yes, that reminds me of the other one: the one where - irrespective of how much unseemly thrashing about there may have been, both parties emerge from the bed in the same full sets of underwear with which they entered (if you see what I mean).

It requires a sense of neatness and order which is well into OCD territory to get completely back into your undies before getting out of bed again.

Left Field
405 lines
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 5:03 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Left Field »

A villain is about to shoot the prospective victim and a shot rings out - but it's the villain who's been shot by the hero or sometimes the police and who then falls dead to the floor.

This sort of incident might be followed by the familiar line, "Let me get you a large brandy!" which follows many traumatic or shocking incidents.

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

Or an eye-rollingly cheery 'I'll make the black coffee!' when someone comes home slightly the worse for wear. Never 'Oh fuck off to bed you tedious dribbling bastard.'

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Recreational drug use will always lead to Bad Things™ ("But we're her fwiends!"), or is used as a short-cut to indicate a Bad Character™. The effects of such drugs will also vary wildly from what they actually do, e.g. the likes of Brookside imbuing LSD-like effects on MDMA.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

squidney
405 lines
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:55 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by squidney »

If you are chasing a car through the streets, which is pretty much a day to day affair if you live in film world, you must just clip the edge of the market stall selling oranges and they must then roll into the road, but the stall must not hamper the chase in any way, nor will you generally injure anyone, despite going at excessive speeds through a busy street.

Cole
625 lines
Posts: 263
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:08 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Cole »

Prison officers are always heartless and/or crooked.

User avatar
Simon36
HD
Posts: 1103
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:43 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon36 »

In soap, anyone who is lying about something, after convincing someone of their innocence, will either over their shoulder when embracing them or once backs are turned, indicate on his face that he is in fact guilty as hell.

Cole
625 lines
Posts: 263
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:08 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Cole »

Simon36 wrote:In soap, anyone who is lying about something, after convincing someone of their innocence, will either over their shoulder when embracing them or once backs are turned, indicate on his face that he is in fact guilty as hell.
That has reminded me of another soap-land one:

This year's fairy-tale wedding will invariably develop into next year's infidelity story.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Cole wrote:
Simon36 wrote:In soap, anyone who is lying about something, after convincing someone of their innocence, will either over their shoulder when embracing them or once backs are turned, indicate on his face that he is in fact guilty as hell.
That has reminded me of another soap-land one:

This year's fairy-tale wedding will invariably develop into next year's infidelity story.
Short-form: All soap weddings are doomed.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

What was the last (non-ironic) use of car crash/cascading items of fruit? My money's on Clockwise.

User avatar
Simon36
HD
Posts: 1103
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 1:43 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon36 »

In tv drama and comedy, all tv shows that they watch or take part in, especially news, game shows and chat shows, are completely hammy.

User avatar
Controller 2957
625 lines
Posts: 192
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 4:27 pm
Location: Derby, UK
Contact:

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Controller 2957 »

Someone stumbling when running from the psychopath/monster must always twist their ankle to such a degree that it renders them largely incapacitated. In turn this requires the twistee to breathlessly and through gritted teeth utter; 'I can't make it, leave me here.'

Anyone trying to sneak past the guards to get in/out of somewhere secure or dangerous must act as suspiciously and obviously as possible with eyes going side-to-side as if following a tennis match.
You see, no-one... NO-ONE escapes the new world!!

The Official Timeslip Website
http://www.timeslip.org.uk

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

People who are late for work still insist on having breakfast.

Cole
625 lines
Posts: 263
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:08 am

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Cole »

All door locks are rubbish and are easily picked.

User avatar
Ian Wegg
625 lines
Posts: 345
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:10 pm

Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Ian Wegg »

... and safes can be opened in seconds with your ear on the door.

Post Reply