Film/TV clichés

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Beaker
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Beaker »

Controller 2957 wrote:Someone stumbling when running from the psychopath/monster must always twist their ankle to such a degree that it renders them largely incapacitated. In turn this requires the twistee to breathlessly and through gritted teeth utter; 'I can't make it, leave me here.'
As in this week's Walking Dead...although with zombies.
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Nick Cooper 625
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Cole wrote:All door locks are rubbish and are easily picked.
I don't make a habit of it (Honest, yer honour!), but I'm quite good at defeating certain types of lock when there is the necessity, mostly padlocks and desk drawers. A lot of combination padlocks can be worked out fairly easily if you know what to look/feel for, and have a bit of time. At one place I worked, I stunned everyone by pointing out that the locked stack of drawers in the lovely new and hideously expensive desks they'd just bought out be opened by simply exerting upwards pressure on one side of one particular drawer, and once that was done, all the rest could be opened. A lot of pin tumbler locks can be picked with a needle, a screwdriver, and a bit of patience.
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Spiny Norman
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Spiny Norman »

Mike S wrote:People who are late for work still insist on having breakfast.
That's a simple matter of priorities.
Beaker wrote:
Controller 2957 wrote:Someone stumbling when running from the psychopath/monster must always twist their ankle to such a degree that it renders them largely incapacitated. In turn this requires the twistee to breathlessly and through gritted teeth utter; 'I can't make it, leave me here.'
As in this week's Walking Dead...although with zombies.
Seriously? Because I was about to say, Oh that's an old one that's already been parodied lots of times.
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Cole
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Cole »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote:
Cole wrote:All door locks are rubbish and are easily picked.
I don't make a habit of it (Honest, yer honour!), but I'm quite good at defeating certain types of lock when there is the necessity, mostly padlocks and desk drawers. A lot of combination padlocks can be worked out fairly easily if you know what to look/feel for, and have a bit of time. At one place I worked, I stunned everyone by pointing out that the locked stack of drawers in the lovely new and hideously expensive desks they'd just bought out be opened by simply exerting upwards pressure on one side of one particular drawer, and once that was done, all the rest could be opened. A lot of pin tumbler locks can be picked with a needle, a screwdriver, and a bit of patience.
There is a lot of truth in that (because of this we've got kite-marked locks front and back as they're supposed to be harder to rock open), but the traditional cliche is being able to pick a lock using a single piece of wire or, if a woman present, the ever-reliable hairpin. Even someone with a prim upbringing, Victoria Waterfield for example, could pull that trick.

Lots complain about how the sonic screwdriver has become the all-powerful tool, but the humble hairpin was the prototype.

Mark Dowding
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mark Dowding »

Cole wrote:
Nick Cooper 625 wrote:
Cole wrote:All door locks are rubbish and are easily picked.
We had a Neighbourhood Watch talk many years ago when the scheme was starting up. The chap from the police brought a few locks with him and showed us how easy it was to open the three lever locks with a bent nail - the sort of lock that you got on a shed or a back door.

Thankfully, unlike the identical episodes of "Wyatt's Watchdogs" and "Terry and June" broadcast one after another on the same night that featured a Neighbourhood Watch talk, none of us found that on returning home from the meeting we had been burgled, although the police chap did tell us that he had heard people mentioning that we were holding a meeting that night. Careless talk and all that!

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

Ever Decreasing Circles and Terry and June wasn't it?

Mark Dowding
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mark Dowding »

Yes - I stand corrected - Thank you!

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Simon36
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Post by Simon36 »

Mike S wrote:Ever Decreasing Circles and Terry and June wasn't it?
Indeed it was: I've raised this one before on a thread. They were both in summer repeat runs and I actually saw it coming, though the BBC didn't. It prompted letters to the Radio Times or Points of View, can't remember which, one saying "did the writers simple both use plot 4b of the comedy scriptwriters handbook?" Still want to know how this happened and how two identical plots got used to start with without anyone noticing! It looks like Terry and June were there first I think, shame on Esmonde and Larbey. Anyway, that's for another thread.

Back to cliches: surprising news is always delivered to someone when they are drinking, and prompts them to nearly choke on it.

Billy
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Billy »

Simon36 wrote:
Mike S wrote:Back to cliches: surprising news is always delivered to someone when they are drinking, and prompts them to nearly choke on it.
Brilliantly parodied in Ricky Gervais's 'Extras' as probably the only genuinely funny joke of When The Whistle Blows.

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Post by ctraynor »

squidney wrote:If you are chasing a car through the streets, which is pretty much a day to day affair if you live in film world, you must just clip the edge of the market stall selling oranges and they must then roll into the road, but the stall must not hamper the chase in any way, nor will you generally injure anyone, despite going at excessive speeds through a busy street.
The Italian Job was good the other night. Minis haring it through piazzas etc. Lots of people around.

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Simon36
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Simon36 »

Quite a major one although less so these days: when someone gets punched in the face, it doesnt hurt either party very much but makes a heck of a strange noise.

Incidentally I've always wondered what that sound actually was that used to be used for fist fights...

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by fatcat »

When the characters are stuck in a remote location and the vehicle they are in is their only means of escape- they always wander off leaving the headlights on full blast.

Ant
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Ant »

Do visual cliches count?

If so - the overlapping-circles used to signify that a character is looking through binoculars. Except real binoculars don't do that.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Ant wrote:Do visual cliches count?

If so - the overlapping-circles used to signify that a character is looking through binoculars. Except real binoculars don't do that.
The first time I looked through a real pair of binoculars (as opposite to the seaside plastic toy type!), I actually though they were broken, because it didn't look like that. I might be wrong, but I think that sort of representation only developed after the introduction of widescreen film formats, but it became so widely accepted that it ended up being used in Acadamy Frame/4:3 TV, as well.
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Controller 2957
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Controller 2957 »

In a sitcom, if a TV set is on and the sound can be heard (but the screen isn't visible) it's nearly always a western shoot-out...
You see, no-one... NO-ONE escapes the new world!!

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Clive
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Clive »

Didn't Brookside have some mock-up TV programme called the 'Magic Rabbits' which was always on their TV's when they needed to have a scene where the telly was being watched ?

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Nick Cooper 625
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Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Clive wrote:Didn't Brookside have some mock-up TV programme called the 'Magic Rabbits' which was always on their TV's when they needed to have a scene where the telly was being watched ?
Yes, that and the soap opera Meadowcroft Park, which was actually a local youth media project run by Mersey TV (Meadowcroft was an early working title for Brookside).

Rather bizarrely, in 1995 Game On featured a fictional American soap opera called Sunset Beach, pre-dating an actual US series of that name by a couple of years.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

DavidT
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by DavidT »

All bombs have big red LED countdown clocks on them.

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Al Dupres
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Al Dupres »

And the fact they flash when they hit zero, when surely as soon as zero is hit the bomb goes off? Grrrrr!

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gran not nan
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by gran not nan »

When it rains, it has to be a torrential downpour and the characters don't seem to be bothered that they're soaked to the skin.

If a character falls into water in a sitcom, they must spit out a mouthful of water as soon as they emerge.

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gran not nan
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Post by gran not nan »

double post

Mike S
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Mike S »

Anybody who sneezes is in the first stages of catching a heavy cold. They can't just...be sneezing.

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Nick Cooper 625
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Mike S wrote:Anybody who sneezes is in the first stages of catching a heavy cold. They can't just...be sneezing.
A Very British Coup is just about the only example I can think of where someone clearly has a cold, but it's not part of the plot, or - IIRC - even remarked up.
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by GarethR »

If a character coughs in a way that we're clearly supposed to notice, even if it's mild and innocuous, it's usually a harbinger of fatal illness.

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Ross
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Ross »

Controller 2957 wrote:In a sitcom, if a TV set is on and the sound can be heard (but the screen isn't visible) it's nearly always a western shoot-out...
And if it's a comedy, you can just hear jaunty "Noseybonk" style music and canned laughter; never dialogue.

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Post by Mike S »

It's sort of died out now, but: the sound of a squealy, AC/DC-style guitar solo to denote a wildchild teenager's bedroom.

'And turn that racket down!'

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paul.austin
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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by paul.austin »

Dated History:

Grand Duchess Anastasia survived (nope, her remains have been found and DNA matched)

Nazi goon Martin Bormann survived (Nope, again DNA matched)

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Post by brigham »

History is certainly dated!

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paul.austin
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Post by paul.austin »

Revisiting the topic of Dated History (as TV Tropes calls it), in which the fate of a historical figure on TV is debunked by real life.

A few days ago, I saw an episode of the Night Gallery series, that was made in the early 1970's. The episode, called "Rare Objects" gave us an eccentric collector (played by Raymond Massey). Among his collection were famous historical people who had mysteriously disappeared (among them, Judge Crater, Roald Admunson, and, yes, Amelia Earhart).

Also among that collection was the Grand Duchess Anastasia who had, according to the collector, "disappeared in 1918".

She never disappeared like Crater and Earhart did. Granted, there was no body (and her remains would not be found until 2007), but didn't most people assume (and later proven correct) that she'd been murdered along with the rest of the family.

Of course, it didn't help matters that you have nuts like Anna Anderson running around claiming to be Anastasia.

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Re: Film/TV clichés

Post by Juswuh »

Ant wrote:
Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:29 pm
Do visual cliches count?

If so - the overlapping-circles used to signify that a character is looking through binoculars. Except real binoculars don't do that.
That actually turns up in the new series of Spiral. I was a bit surprised.

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