Tv Times

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Simon36
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Tv Times

Post by Simon36 »

"There's so much more than TVTimes, in TVTimes magazine da-da-dah!"

As the ad went...

Thought I'd start a TV Times thread partly after seeing the references on the Thatcher thread and partly because I just bought off ebay 1100 editions on disc for a fiver, which was rather amazing.

It was never as interesting a publication to me as the RT though it definitely did have a very individual voice in each of its eras. The 70s editions are staggeringly patronising in their attitudes to women, who it seemed entirely aimed at. But the early 80s were a rather good time for it, gorgeous fonts, lavish listings and occasionally quote astute film reviews, probably helped by the fact it was now listing Channel 4 too.

Just wondered if it is the case that each font change and makeover was directly linked to a new editor?

Is it still going now? Who the hell buys it?

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Re: Tv Times

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

I used to buy it when there was still a monopoly on listings (and for about a year after thate neded), but it always did seem to be more akin to a women's magazine - includign the "problem page" - that just happened to include TV listings. It seems bizarre it retrospect that one of the "see also page..." articles for Hardwicke House is Roy Kinnear's favourite recipe, in detail!
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Re: Tv Times

Post by Simon36 »

If you look at the listings for THRILLER you get "see alsos" with titles like "Why English girls are the best says Ed Cookie Byrnes" and "After three marriages you start to get cautious says Anthony Steel". You got bugger all about the programmes themselves! TV Times journalists could be wolves in sheeps clothing in the 70s. They regularly stitched up actors and printed rather tabloidy pieces about them that were completely unfair representations of the interviews. (I know, this hardly makes them unique).

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Re: Tv Times

Post by RobinCarmody »

Simon36 wrote:Is it still going now? Who the hell buys it?
It's still going, but its circulation is miniscule compared to the likes of 'What's on TV' (which have cornered the tabloid-reading audience) and RT (which has found a niche, the one that enjoyed it most before listings deregulation). It couldn't thrive left open to competition because there was no real affection or love for what it was itself, it was something people bought because they had to, I think, not something they'd have bought anyway because they genuinely loved it. For the BBC's core audience in the 1970s, there was actually a greater affection for RT than there was for a lot of the programmes listed in it, but nobody loved TV Times like they loved Crossroads or 3-2-1, even the untold millions who loved those programmes completely unironically, it was just there. And things that are just there never really survive when they're not protected by monopoly.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by David Savage »

I loved (and love) the '70s TV Times and almost everything about it; its glossy paper, its layout, its picture icons to indicate whether a programme is News, Cartoon, or Sport, its little sign indicating repeats, its SEE PANEL instruction, its little star to indicate colour, its abundant photo illustrations, and copious programme information (even a five minute Tweety Pie could get a paragraph of description) and production credits.

Some of its articles might have been more likely to be about The Cars of The Stars rather than the programmes, but it was a doorway to an exotic world of ITV showbiz glamour, taking you scuba diving with Jon Pertwee, or through James Mason's favourite Swiss vineyard or Harry Andrews's Sussex oast house. Much of the writing was lively, it had decent interviews with and informative biographical features on the biggest variety comedians of the day, and many serious articles relating to documentaries and current affairs; a very good cartoon page, too. I thought it went dreadful in the early 80s when it changed to a hideous new design.

70s Radio Times, by comparison, often seemed rather drab and middlebrow; great art covers but some dull writing, poor paper quality with some very inadequate photographic reproduction, and a seeming attempt to give minimal information about as many of the programmes as possible.

9.25 The Frost Interview
Who will be the man or woman who comes face to
face to face with David Frost?

Yes, please tell us, Radio Times; that's why we spent 8 pence on you!

I suspect that most folk, having to buy both at the time probably enjoyed TV Times and grinned and bore Radio Times.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

I agree.
With the exception of the Xmas edition , it was the Radio Times that seemed the one that people only bought because they had to . Its lifeless drab paper , articles seemingly always about things on BBC2 and Radio 3 - no comparison with the TV Times of 1968-1980.
Larger format most of the time , articles about programmes that people will actually watch , lots of colour . I think the TVT was much better than the RT of the same era.
And comparing them today backs that up .
A regular edition of the TV Times from the early to mid 70's can often fetch up to 10 times the price that an RT will go for on ebay .
Having said that , if you compare the dvd scans of the 2 mags from 1964-1969 ( the only RT discs I have apart from Xmas 63-90) the RT had the edge up to 1968 - perhaps thats why some regions had alternatives like TV World which was far superior to the TVT .
Fortunately the TV Times used the arrival of new franchise regions in 1968 to kick start the TVT and a month or so after the new companies started the TVT had a massive facelift which worked wonders

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Re: Tv Times

Post by doubleM »

David Savage wrote:I loved (and love) the '70s TV Times and almost everything about it; its glossy paper, its layout, its picture icons to indicate whether a programme is News, Cartoon, or Sport, its little sign indicating repeats, its SEE PANEL instruction, its little star to indicate colour, its abundant photo illustrations, and copious programme information (even a five minute Tweety Pie could get a paragraph of description) and production credits.

Some of its articles might have been more likely to be about The Cars of The Stars rather than the programmes, but it was a doorway to an exotic world of ITV showbiz glamour, taking you scuba diving with Jon Pertwee, or through James Mason's favourite Swiss vineyard or Harry Andrews's Sussex oast house. Much of the writing was lively, it had decent interviews with and informative biographical features on the biggest variety comedians of the day, and many serious articles relating to documentaries and current affairs; a very good cartoon page, too. I thought it went dreadful in the early 80s when it changed to a hideous new design.

70s Radio Times, by comparison, often seemed rather drab and middlebrow; great covers but some dull writing, poor paper quality with some very inadequate photographic reproduction, and a seeming attempt to give minimal information about as many of the programmes as possible.

9.25 The Frost Interview
Who will be the man or woman who comes face to
face to face with David Frost?

Yes, please tell us, Radio Times; that's why we spent 8 pence on you!

I suspect that most folk, having to buy both at the time probably enjoyed TV Times and grinned and bore Radio Times.

I agree with just about all of that David! Very well put.
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Re: Tv Times

Post by RobinCarmody »

I do appreciate the subsequent posts in this thread (not so keen on the vaguely "working-class Tory" inverted snobbery in one of them, but David makes some good points). I suppose that my point about TV Times no longer inspiring any affection for what it was in itself, as opposed to the affection for e.g. Coronation Street, applies much more to the situation that developed between the relaunch in 1981 and listings deregulation in 1991. Different in the 70s I'm sure.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by stearn »

deltavega wrote:A regular edition of the TV Times from the early to mid 70's can often fetch up to 10 times the price that an RT will go for on ebay.
Partly because there are fewer copies of TV Times surviving, and partly due to one particular collector who has a bottomless pit of money to fill gaps.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by TonyCurrie »

deltavega wrote:Fortunately the TV Times used the arrival of new franchise regions in 1968 to kick start the TVT and a month or so after the new companies started the TVT had a massive facelift which worked wonders
No. It didn't. The always-meddling ITA got involved in something that was - frankly - none of their business. They decided that they didn't like the regional alternatives to TV Times. Much in the same way that they decided they didn't like popular ITV programmes and pressurised companies into takling them off (q.v. The One O'Clock Gang, Take Your Pic, Double Your Money). London snobbery meant that the ITA simply didn't "get" the local loyalty and genuine affection that was engendered by The Viewer (aka Look Westward), Television Weekly, TV Post. (I exclude TV World because it was simply a rather better version of TV Times produced by Odhams Press and in an ideal world would have inherited the TVT mantle). But from 1968, the ITA quite simply forced the companies into signing up for TV Times. The first "all-UK" issue had its weaknesses. Like the first heading on the front cover "The First Englishman to Set Foot on the Moon?" it trumpeted, instantly forgetting that it was now supposed to be a 'national' magazine serving Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales, the latter two having been forced to give up their own mags. To compound this, they managed to print Ulster's logo upside down on every single page of the magazine. Not terribly impressive. Likewise the use of the black star to denote a colour programme got terribly boring when there might only be one monochrome programme that day. Curiously, I have two different editions of the first London colour issue. The first uses outline stars - the second has the stars in black. (There are a number of other elements that changed during the print run, suggesting that Peter Jackson was making it up as he went along!!)

At its inception, TV Times was simply the programme guide produced by and for Associated-Rediffusion, and by an historic accident the Midlands and Northern contractors agreed to accept its services, although ABC didn't sign up until after their first weekend on air. Personally, I loved its journalistic style - very tabloid and far removed from Radio Times, and often hit the nail on the head in knowing how to appeal to its core market. Sadly, I thought it rather lost direction after the 1968 relaunch; prior to that even the Border Edition had a good smattering of local features and each local edition was allowed a decent double-page spread about something on pages 2 and 3. Excellent local journalism of a kind you simply don't come across these days.

(I should declare a tiny interest - I did briefly have a column in the STV edition in the mid 70s, and remember once having to write it on a Telex machine, sending the copy direct to Bemrose's in Liverpool where it was typeset as I wrote it!!!)

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Re: Tv Times

Post by RobinCarmody »

I think there was an element of "good tabloid journalism" in the old TV Times of the sort I would also associate with the 1950s & 60s Daily Mirror, which rather got squeezed out of the market later on (parallels with ITV itself entirely intentional).

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Re: Tv Times

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

deltavega wrote:A regular edition of the TV Times from the early to mid 70's can often fetch up to 10 times the price that an RT will go for on ebay .
I would think that that's only true because less people kept copies of TVT, on top of the fact that it had a much lower circulation than the RT to begin with. Certainly when I used to do book fairs in the 1980s and 1990s, the ratio on sale seemed to be about 5-to-1 if not more. The same week's TVT may command a higher price these days compared to the equivalent RT, but for reasons of scarcity, not quality.
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Re: Tv Times

Post by David Savage »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote: I would think that that's only true because less people kept copies of TVT, on top of the fact that it had a much lower circulation than the RT to begin with.
I wouldn't have thought either were particularly kept. Both would have been considered ephemeral in the extreme at the time, useless by the end of the week. (Radio Times kept by Whovians, though, maybe?)

Where did you source the '70s circulation figures? With more people generally watching ITV and TV Times being a much more populist, accessible and attractive magazine, I expected it to have had the higher sales.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by simon10011 »

From a collecting point of view i much prefer the TV Times to The Radio Times. The covers are much better on TVT, covering the more mainstream comedies and drama's whereas RT's cover always seemed to be about some obscure science or history documentary, with covers for Steptoe and Son or Z cars being few and far between. The Articles in TVT also i prefer not so much about the programmes but about the people connected with them.
I recently went to a collectors shop which i used to go to and where i picked up quite alot of TV and Radio Times. When i visited only a few weeks ago they had piles of Radio Times but absolutely no TV Times!!

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Re: Tv Times

Post by ian b »

David Savage wrote:9.25 The Frost Interview
Who will be the man or woman who comes face to
face to face with David Frost?

Yes, please tell us, Radio Times; that's why we spent 8 pence on you!
As a topical programme, hardly unexpected that whatever that particular programme was going comprise of wasn't known when the Radio Gimes went to press.

It's not as if the TVT listings for the earlier FROST ON... runs are any more detailed.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by ian b »

David Savage wrote:
Nick Cooper 625 wrote:I wouldn't have thought either were particularly kept. Both would have been considered ephemeral in the extreme at the time, useless by the end of the week. (Radio Times kept by Whovians, though, maybe?)
You'd be surprised by how many local bulk purchases I made in the mid-80s from people, or their relatives, that had stock-piled runs of RT issues, some for decades at a time. Just the Radio Times by the way, with ne'er a TVT in sight.

In contrast, the only large amount of the TVT I ever came across came from the London area.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by JWG »

Did libraries ever take them? (I'd imagine that they'd've feel happier with the RT than the TVT).If so,have any come on the market in bulk with libraries' move away from vile print?

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Re: Tv Times

Post by David Savage »

ian b wrote:
David Savage wrote:9.25 The Frost Interview
Who will be the man or woman who comes face to
face to face with David Frost?

Yes, please tell us, Radio Times; that's why we spent 8 pence on you!
As a topical programme, hardly unexpected that whatever that particular programme was going comprise of wasn't known when the Radio Gimes went to press.

It's not as if the TVT listings for the earlier FROST ON... runs are any more detailed.

But even on a repeat of, say, Monty Python's Flying Circus or Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, there'd be no description of which episode it actually was, just a cast list. Many new programmes would also just have a title (if applicable) and cast list, no actual details of content, whereas TV Times always did.

JWG wrote:Did libraries ever take them? (I'd imagine that they'd've feel happier with the RT than the TVT).If so,have any come on the market in bulk with libraries' move away from vile print?
Bigger libraries seemed to take both.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

David Savage wrote:
Nick Cooper 625 wrote: I would think that that's only true because less people kept copies of TVT, on top of the fact that it had a much lower circulation than the RT to begin with.
I wouldn't have thought either were particularly kept. Both would have been considered ephemeral in the extreme at the time, useless by the end of the week. (Radio Times kept by Whovians, though, maybe?)

Where did you source the '70s circulation figures? With more people generally watching ITV and TV Times being a much more populist, accessible and attractive magazine, I expected it to have had the higher sales.
There are various refernces to the RT being the best selling magazine in Europe, let alone in the UK. The only accurate figures I could find for TVT was what it was selling a million copies in 1956 compared to an average of 8,591,378 for the RT, while TVT by [url=ttp://www.printanddigitalresearchforum.com/papers/97.pdf]1980 was 3.2 million[/url], while the RT was 3,487,592. Apparently TVT had a higher readership per copy, so overall it was only marginally less read than the RT.

Obviously in the majority of cases, a household taking one magazine will have taken the other, whith a minority taking only a single publication. Obviously there must have been some who took only TVT, but by 1980 there were still at least 300,000 more taking only the RT. That's at least 300,000 people buying the RT because they saw it as being something more than TVT was. As Ian has noted, there seem to be far more cases of people who hoarded RT, certainly that's been my own annecdotal experience.
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Re: Tv Times

Post by ian b »

David Savage wrote:But even on a repeat of, say, Monty Python's Flying Circus or Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, there'd be no description of which episode it actually was, just a cast list.
Repeat billings are usually just a reprint of the original programme information originated by the production team that made the programme - or, if we are talking decades later, by whoever is responsible for the repeat. I'm sure Tony can give us chapter and verse on the process.

But if, as in the case of the two programmes you mention, they carry no on-screen episode title, (or they have come to be identified by titles long after the event), the Radio Times can hardly be blamed for not printing them in the first place. (Though isn't there some half-hearted attempt originally to title PYTHON - and, from memory, only JESSICA'S FIRST CHRISTMAS got an official title back in the day.)

The only period that comes to mind where the RT is being deliberately obtuse, is a short while when editor Nicholas Brett decided episode titles were unnecessary and dropped them. (So anyone relying on the RT to compile a run of, say, BERGERAC will have to track down the repeat run to get the titles - but pity the CASUALTY devotee). Though since the mid-90s it does seem pot luck as if repeated sitcoms get a generic title billing, but no episode info, (runs of STEPTOE repeats spring to mind) - but that could be because a final decision as to which particular show will be running.

I certainly had no major problem compiling lists to virtually all drama and comedy programmes in the mid-90s, for 1962 onwards, (incluing repeat runs) - but I'll grant that with less space devoted to the billings in the past couple of decades, a similar project now for the interim would be much harder.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by JWG »

I wonder how many households just took the Radio Times for the,uh,radio times?

4 million 'radio only' licences in 1960,bit over 2 million in 1970,according to That Site. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television ... istorical)

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Re: Tv Times

Post by David Savage »

ian b wrote: Repeat billings are usually just a reprint of the original programme information originated by the production team that made the programme - or, if we are talking decades later, by whoever is responsible for the repeat. I'm sure Tony can give us chapter and verse on the process.

But if, as in the case of the two programmes you mention, they carry no on-screen episode title, (or they have come to be identified by titles long after the event), the Radio Times can hardly be blamed for not printing them in the first place.

Whoever's to blame, if Radio Times only printed bare bones cast listings for, say, their sketch shows and TV Times gave details of sketches and themes for each episode of their own - or, whereas, for a show like Sykes, the Radio Times would give no content details beyond a title, like 'The Pub', while TV Times had a short paragraph or two of plot details for each of its own sitcoms, I can justifiably say that TV Times gave more copious programme information, and Radio Times's was often minimal.

I mentioned repeats just to make clear it's not just a case of "content not known at the time of going to press."

I'm still referring to '70s era, as above. I think the TV Times of this period really reflects the widely diverse and highly watchable ITV of the time, from lowbrow and populist to serious and cutting edge: Arthur Mullard to Current Affairs and Documentaries. Also very good for fulsome details on children's programmes; quite detailed descriptions of each edition of Clapperboard, for example. Another area where Radio Times was quite minimal. A typical issue really plunges you into that long gone era of ITV's showbiz frivolity/public service brew, whereas Radio Times, features-wise, doesn't tend to straddle such a broad spectrum of programme styles. That's another reason I also find it the most interesting and nostalgically appealing.

Thanks for your thoughts on circulation figures and hoarding, Nick. I suppose you also have to weigh in the factor that many people used to be quite snobbish about ITV and, by extension, TV Times.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by doubleM »

Major reference libraries (in the big cities at least) would certainly take both Radio Times and TV Times e.g. Birmingham, Manchester, Westminster.

In the case of Westminster Reference Library .. the TV Times were bound in red volumes and Radio Times in green. In the early 2000s, the coverage on the shelves were from 1980 onwards but the 70s and earlier editions were kept in a store but could be retrieved on request.

The 1970s TVTs could be manually handled for photocopying on the public machines .. but this was not allowed for the Radio Times - you had to read and take notes. Hardly surprising as the quality of the paper used in the 70s (and indeed right onto the mid 80s) for RT was appalling - worse than newspapers of the day, yellowy, thin and not lacking in 'grain' and they would stick together when a colour photo was used for advertising etc. The TVT paper in comparison was glossy, quality heaven and certainly 25 years later was in excellent nick!
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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

TonyCurrie wrote:
deltavega wrote:Fortunately the TV Times used the arrival of new franchise regions in 1968 to kick start the TVT and a month or so after the new companies started the TVT had a massive facelift which worked wonders
No. It didn't.
Whatever the reason was behind the changes , the fact remains that a few weeks after the new regions started the TV TImes DID have a massive facelift and it changed it from a worthless rag into a colourful enjoyable magazine that blew the Radio Times away

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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote:
deltavega wrote:A regular edition of the TV Times from the early to mid 70's can often fetch up to 10 times the price that an RT will go for on ebay .
I would think that that's only true because less people kept copies of TVT, on top of the fact that it had a much lower circulation than the RT to begin with. Certainly when I used to do book fairs in the 1980s and 1990s, the ratio on sale seemed to be about 5-to-1 if not more. The same week's TVT may command a higher price these days compared to the equivalent RT, but for reasons of scarcity, not quality.
Not sure how anyone can look at a TV TImes of the 70's and say the RT is better quality .
I would say its quality by a mile because as you can see from other opinions the RT issues of that era are as dull as ditchwater in comparison to the TVT .
The scans of TV Times make for interesting reading but Radio Times of the 70's - in general are as captivating now as they were when they came out .

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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

stearn wrote:
deltavega wrote:A regular edition of the TV Times from the early to mid 70's can often fetch up to 10 times the price that an RT will go for on ebay.
Partly because there are fewer copies of TV Times surviving, and partly due to one particular collector who has a bottomless pit of money to fill gaps.
I don't think Andyrw is completely to blame . The fact that prices go so high proves there would be at least one other bidder trying to keep up with him.
Did you see the recent auction for 30 issues from the 70's and 80's including 2 copies of the Xmas 1975 edition - both the same region mind - £320 . Mental price when you consider how the value of the mag drops like a stone from the 80's onwards.
The number of times you have to relist yours to get a sale shows that general issues don't always fetch £20+ but it is common to see Radio TImes of the 70's sit unsold at under a fiver delivered.
RT issues may be easier to get but people generally don't want them because they are dull in comparison.
I used to have the bound volumes of 1970-1977 but they were useful for reference only so I sold them.
TVT I don't mind getting odd issues of as its nearly always a good read - mainly as the regional variations make the schedules a far more interesting browse than an issue of the RT.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by stearn »

The fact you knew who I was talking about shows you are watching prices.

You are right, you need two people bidding, but there is certainly an element of 'well Andyrw is going to pay whatever so let's have a bit of fun' amongst other bidders. There are other people who do really need to fill a gap and get outbid though.

£320 for 30 copies, including two of a Christmas edition is not exactly a steep price. Christmas RTs from the 70s often fetch £50 each (or more) depending on the condition/region, so a TVT which is rarer should command a premium. I'd say a fair price, but not one I was willing to pay. I come from a slightly different angle - I am buying to digitise, so the majority of my mags go in the recycling afterwards. I have opted to sell TVTs where I can as it is a bit of fun and it does allow me to buy other editions to fill gaps or go regional with the scanning. If they don't sell, they go back into the boxes and I get some others out. A lot of my unsold re-listing has been down to becoming a father and not having the time to bother with much new.

I don't agree with your conclusion that 70s RTs don't sell because they are dull. There is too much competition in selling, and who is going to bother to spend time on a listing that will get you sod all. Ebay and paypal take 15%, or thereabouts, and postage and decent packing for one mag now is a few quid. So if you put one up for a fiver delivered, I might buy it if I need it, but I certainly wouldn't want the effort of selling it for the few pence I would end up with. Those that do sell are those generally in better condition or have specific interest material on the cover - Doctor Who, The Beatles, Christmas editions. In the case of TV Times the quality/condition is less of an issue as you may not see another for some considerable time.

As has been said earlier, there are more collections of RT out there than TVT, and I am sure it stems from the radio aspect of the Radio Times, not the television. Nearly all the collections I have bought (and I have around 3 tonnes of magazines, and have processed at least a tonne in the last 5 years) have been Radio Times. There was one equal run of Radio and TV Times, one solely TV Times, and two have been The Listener.

My interest started because of Radio, not television, so I am a latecomer to collecting TV Times. My RT bound volumes (a complete set) are consulted very regularly as they are all London region and the majority of my loose collections are regional, and I concentrate on the regions for digitisation now that the Genome Project has covered the London region.

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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

I think £320 for those particular 30 issues was well over the top . It averages out at over £10 an issue . £20 -£25 each is an average for the 2 copies of Xmas 1975 but the other issues were late 70's which don't usually fetch as much - and issues from the 80's are , in general lucky to sell at all .

There is a special place , I think , for a lot of people for the RT XMas issues and 69-79 specially always go well but I don't think its because the mag is better than the TV Times of the same era . The TV Times for those years , I find , is much better - but it was the heyday for the BBC at Xmas and I think the popularity of the RT Xmas for those years now is more connected to that .

I gave up collecting the actual mags to keep a long time ago and now I buy only to add to the scans collection. I have borrowed a ridiculous amount of issues from a collector that I have in 3 boxes - issues from the late 50's up to 1977 - over a hundred but scanning is so tedious . I've been doing them for a few months now but not even halfway yet .

On a separate note , maybe you can clarify: this BBC project we keep hearing about . Isn't it just a tabulation of the schedules ? I heard the BBC were going to make it available online - now if that was proper scans of Radio Times magazines themselves I would be excited and even willing to pay but last I heard the BBC were not allowed to actually carry the original pages - only the programme information .
Useful I know - but a massive letdown for anyone not just looking for schedules.

The RT had dvd scan discs of RT removed from ebay last year . Why ? Scans on disc has a huge amount of interest and is increasing all the time with people opting for e-readers etc and its an area that virtually no publishers are taking advantage of .
Marvel have done a few .
If the hard work of scanning has been done then the RT are losing out by not making them available- although I daresay there may be issues with reusing content only ever intended to appear in that format at that time.
Any clues ?

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stearn
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Re: Tv Times

Post by stearn »

Horses for courses really - you'll be surprised what does sell and what doesn't, and for what. I still say that £320 for what you describe - I didn't see the listing - isn't outlandish. BTW I would extend your period of interest in RT to 63-79 - the Timelord effect.

I think the appeal of the RT against TVT comes from your interest. Mine was predominantly radio, so TVT just didn't cut the mustard. Going through them now I am finding all sorts of stuff relevant to the Network releases, so they are a more interesting read. Before the many series that Network have churned out I doubt there would have been the incentive to stop and read the articles. RT also has a very longstanding history of illustration, and this is a whole side to collecting the magazine. There is an exhibition starting this week at the Chris Beetles gallery - details, links, and a covers gallery on my site http://www.radiotimesarchive.com.

Scanning can be tedious, but I opted for a industrial scale model that duplexes at high speeds. Not the cheapest, but I can get through a few dozen magazines in a day if pushed. The OCR is the slower side of the process now, but I generally concentrate on the scanning side as, for the TV Times anyway, the TVTiP database is available if there is some serious research to be done.

The Genome Project was the complete digitisation of the Radio Times, and although I was the researcher in the early stages and put together the collection for scanning, I have had no information since I completed the research and everything went to France to be scanned. There was an announcement not that long ago that the work had been completed and it was available internally for BBC staff, but the return of a large run of my magazines recently is the only contact I have had with the project.

I am sure the remit has changed, but the initial press releases stated that the schedule information was to be made available to the public via the bbc.co.uk/programmes pages. It was never going to be full issues or images due to copyright complications, but presumably they have hit some other problems along the way.

Why were RT discs removed - I can only assume it is due to copyright. The magazines and the contents - predominantly the articles and glossy photos you love, are still usually within copyright, and wholesale clearance is too big a task. The RT have been protecting their magazines, but IPC chose not to bother with TVT, hence there was the free for all with the discs of scans.

deltavega
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Re: Tv Times

Post by deltavega »

Yes it was copyright but I do wonder why the RT protect their copyright so stringently when they don't ever need to . But I guess someone able to convince publishers they need to employ someone as " Head of Heritage" has to justify the position somehow .
If for no other reason - the discs aid the interest in the history of the magazine so their availability does no harm - it's not as if anyone is actually losing income they would otherwise earn.

I can see that someone with an interest in radio would find the RT better which makes it annoying that some of the RT Xmas issues have radio listings missing although I've ensured all the ones I scan do include them but I skip the full page ads for some as it just takes so long.

The 80's Xmas editions of the TV TImes ( and likely regular issues too) seem to be a full 50% of adverts- much much more advertising than the 70's issues.

At one time the TV Times was jointly owned by the ITV companies . I've not really followed its ownership changes .
Who actually owns the IPC archive ( if there is one) as the TV TImes could be the least of that collection which features many great comics.

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