Grange Hill

What's not currently on the box
rachel leah
405 lines
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 1:41 pm

Grange Hill

Post by rachel leah »

I have watched Grange Hill 1986 series for the 1st time since it originally aired 27 years ago. It feels special to see something as an adult that I vividly remember through a child's eyes.

Stuff that strike me watching this as an adult that I didn't see as a child:

-The Mr Bronson character: As a child he was just a teacher that was in every school. Now I see a cleverly written and well acted character. They put a bit of mystery in his background so it's not two dimentional. I liked how one scene showed his discomfort around female pupils when they asked him about the plaster on his neck and he said that his sister's parrot bit him.

-The realistic way the parallel hidden society in the school playground is portrayed from Gonch/Pogo's money making schemes to pupil alliances and vendettas.

-The fact that comprehensive recruited kids like "Zammo" were better actors than stage school kids.

-The forgotton character of Ant Jones flooded back to my memory. Not only is he written and acted well, but it shows the reality of how in schools, the nicer kids would sometimes get into trouble more than the really malitious ones.

-How much softer the teachers are in 1986 than in 1981.

-This brings me to my next point, in that in the 1986 series I see a slightly leftie liberal point being pushed that wasn't pushed as much in 1981ish. For example Mr Bronson is sometimes portrayed as a nasty dinosaur.
Bullet Baxter and Mrs McClusky = good but tough.
The female art teachers = nice. Now personally I think a school is better off with a few Mr Bronsons and less soppy art teachers, yet the program makers portray him as a bad thing.

Grange Hill started to go down after this series. First because it took itself too seriously with "Branding" and pushing a record for cash.
Secondly, because some bog Comprehensives started to become too nasty to portray.
Some might say that it just started to run out of storylines but I disagree. For example there was a silly portrayal of a single teenage Mum a few years later. By the 90's, single teenage Mums were so common in some schools that one moralising example didn't stand up to reality.
By 1991 a friend of mine was walking a mile to my school to avoid her own local comprehensive. The Jeremy Kyle Show does a better job of showing the school she was trying to avoid than Grange Hill ever could.
So the show descended into donkey storylines and pampering Danny Kendell. He was the serial truent who kept saying "Keep Bronson off my Back" to Mrs McClusky while looking stoned. Mrs McClusky, just 7 years earlier caned a girl for bunking off only once. I don't remember schools changing that much in the 1980's but maybe I am wrong ?

Sorry if this is long winded. I personally enjoy the Gripper era more, even though this series is nearer my age group but I was surprised how well it held up and quite enjoyed it.

User avatar
Roll ACR
625 lines
Posts: 233
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 5:11 pm
Location: Winchester

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Roll ACR »

Grange Hill totally passed me by as a child/teenager. It was banned in our house because Mum considered it "vulgar" and a "bad influence".

rachel leah
405 lines
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 1:41 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by rachel leah »

I avidly watched it from age 5 (1981) to when it started to go down the toilet. I think I gradually stopped after 1987 but the early 90's storyline of a teenage pregnancy really put me off for good.

fatcat
D-MAC
Posts: 847
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:02 am

Re: Grange Hill

Post by fatcat »

rachel leah wrote:I avidly watched it from age 5 (1981) to when it started to go down the toilet. I think I gradually stopped after 1987 but the early 90's storyline of a teenage pregnancy really put me off for good.
I think that when a programme gets too pleased with itself and starts being a nanny (preaching about teenage pregnancy etc) to its viewers, then is the time to change channel.

User avatar
Ross
D-MAC
Posts: 646
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:06 am

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Ross »

I was an avid viewer during the Tucker and Zammo years. In the late-80s it got very preachy and was full of bad acting and bad writing. I thought it might be me, as I was in the sixth form and growing out of the show, but watching the repeats a few years later I realised I was right to an extent. The extent being that what had come before it hadn't always been that great, either.

It was a landmark show and a big part of my childhood, but in hindsight I wish they'd just stuck to a maximum of 13 episodes a year, maybe just nine like the first series, and cancelled it in the mid-80s. It must've eaten a lot of the children's drama budget and was soon repeating itself or resorting to padding, ridiculous comedy or outright melodrama.

The nadir for me was a gang fight arranged to take place on a wasteland. After some laughable build-up - kids popping up 'menacingly' from behind bins, piles of rubble etc - the whole situation was defused by a schoolgirl mother pushing a pram between both sides and berating them.

A younger friend told me it got even worse in the 90s, with tokenism of the worst sort and drama based on what a liberal would like to be so rather than what would realistically happen.

A Bunch of Fives and Golden Hill did the same thing with far more skill and economy.

Grange Hill had its moments, though. Tucker, Jonah, Roland and Zammo were great characters; Gripper and Booger Benson scarily realistic bullies as was Imelda; some of the teachers were well-portrayed as well, especially Bullet Baxter and Mr Bronson.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

I would guess that the reason for the apparent inconsistencies is that writing and production teams change a lot quicker than school administrations do. During my school years, at any given institution, only a small number of teachers came or went, and I know from older and younger siblings that majority had been and continued to be there for a very long time. Generally speaking, in real life only a change of head teacher can effect a rapid and wide-ranging change, unless it's due to an external cause (e.g. corporal punishment in state-funded schools being outlawed in 1987).

As Ross hints at, I think Grange Hill's undoing was in going from a somewhat santised view of what schools really were like at the time, to what the later production teams thought they were or should be, and this certainly is what makes Waterloo Road such utter fantasy-world trash now.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

Clive
625 lines
Posts: 279
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:53 pm
Location: Stockholm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Clive »

I did feel there was a big change on how education was handled in the 80's. When I started senior school in the early 80's the school was full of those eccentric Mr Bronson types who had been there for decades and accepted no nonesense or back chat. When I left in the late 80's there was a new breed of younger hip teachers fresh from teacher training with a lot more open ideas about how to deal and communicate with school kids.

So in some ways I do feel that Grange Hill did try to represent this more liberal change in schools during the 80's. Although the general preachy-ness that crept into GH storylines in the late 80's led to it's downfall, or perhaps it was just myself getting older and more cynical. One of my friends who is around 6 years younger than me maintains the late 80's were GH's golden age.

GarethR
HD
Posts: 1160
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:18 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by GarethR »

Clive wrote:One of my friends who is around 6 years younger than me maintains the late 80's were GH's golden age.
And that's the kind of thing you expect, of course. With all long-running shows you'll find plenty of people who think that different eras were the best, it largely depends on how old you are and when you started watching. People in their late 30s or early 40s might think that GH jumped the shark in the early 90s, but it ran for almost another two decades beyond that, so it was doing *something* right. I'm sure you'll find people who think its final incarnation (2003-08) was the best.

"My" GH ended in about 1988, when I stopped watching it religiously. Not because I thought it wasn't worth it any more (although its direct relevance to me would have been waning because I left school and started college in 1987), but because my interests were naturally changing as I grew up and I wasn't necessarily in front of a TV when it was on.

RayB
405 lines
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:30 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by RayB »

There is a whole discussion to be had around the education system in 80's Britain, but this is probably not the place.

What I will say is, I saw the very, very worst and also some of the best - first hand. One of the biggest things to happen was the abolishment of corporal punishment - once the threat of the cane was gone, much of the "control" went with it. With the value of good old hindsight, GH shows this well, but I can't recall if specific references were ever made to it.

Credit to the writing team for reflecting what was "life" to a greater or lesser degree, especially in ILEA run schools.

rachel leah
405 lines
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 1:41 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by rachel leah »

Ross wrote: The nadir for me was a gang fight arranged to take place on a wasteland. After some laughable build-up - kids popping up 'menacingly' from behind bins, piles of rubble etc - the whole situation was defused by a schoolgirl mother pushing a pram between both sides and berating them....
Yes that gang fight is the teenage pregnancy story I was talking about. That really was the nadir and made me cringe. I never watched it again after that.
Nick Cooper wrote:As Ross hints at, I think Grange Hill's undoing was in going from a somewhat santised view of what schools really were like at the time, to what the later production teams thought they were or should be, and this certainly is what makes Waterloo Road such utter fantasy-world trash now.....
Yes that is spot on.
I thought the Gripper era was quite realistic for school at the time, minus the swearing. I went through something very similar to Gripper and Roland in school a few years later. I was the token chubby kid in those days.

I liked the way the parallel society in school were portrayed with a Chemistry lesson going on while one kid whispers to the other with to meet in the playground or plot something.

Then you got regular "good" teachers like "Hopwood" smacking Tucker's friend round the head in 1980 for smoking and then in 1986, Mr Bronson, who never laid a finger on anyone, is portrayed as a baddie.

The family backgrounds of Gripper and Imelda were always a big mystery, like they were with horrible kids in real life.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

RayB wrote:One of the biggest things to happen was the abolishment of corporal punishment - once the threat of the cane was gone, much of the "control" went with it.
Obviously we can't turn the clock back, but the biggest problem with abolishing CP was that there was nothing in place to make up for its sudden absence. Today, I think most people would be stunned at the time- and resource-consuming "strategies" and "interventions" that have been developed to ineffectively replace the swift justice of the past.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

rachel leah
405 lines
Posts: 41
Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 1:41 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by rachel leah »

I'm actually against CP in schools.
Yet I don't think school should be as soft as Grange Hill started to be circa 1986. It was that strange turnaround in teacher behaviour in the series in just a few years that makes me wonder if it happened in real life without me noticing it.

My belief against CP is partly because I'm female. It's un PC to say so but I think women are more likely to be against it. I also think it traumatises weaker kids and can be horribly abused by those in authority. Also I'm against it because of my non-British background. My parents came from countries that banned school CP in the late 1940's-50's. Yet their education was better than that of many British schools. There are many countries in the former Communist countries and Western Europe where school CP was banned early on, yet on the education system still stayed orderly and is quite good. I think it matters more that schools can easily expel pupils without problems and that the pupils have a family that backs up the teachers at home whenever there are complaints. Post 1986 Grange Hill teachers became too soft regardless of whether they could thump kids or not.

I agree with RayB that the earlier series deserve credit for showing some reality in state schools.

I didn't intend to turn this into a soapbox discussing the politics of CP. I just found these odd changes in the series and wonder if it happened in real life too, or if it was just the production team changing.
Either way Grange Hill is an interesting social document.
Like I said, there are lots of other little complexities in characters and school life that they put in and are quite nice to see now as an adult.

RayB
405 lines
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:30 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by RayB »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote:
RayB wrote:One of the biggest things to happen was the abolishment of corporal punishment - once the threat of the cane was gone, much of the "control" went with it.
Obviously we can't turn the clock back, but the biggest problem with abolishing CP was that there was nothing in place to make up for its sudden absence. Today, I think most people would be stunned at the time- and resource-consuming "strategies" and "interventions" that have been developed to ineffectively replace the swift justice of the past.
Exactly. The school I was at in London (which is famed for being "The worst school in England" at one point) had abolished CP long before the national ban. I could tell you tales of rioting, violence, crime and total unruliness. Contrast that to the school I moved to in Hampshire over the course of a weekend - everyone in uniform, polite, quiet, respectful and great educational pedigree. Oh, and they still had CP, too...

If you've not seen David Leland's "Tales out of school" can I recommend it? He was not far wide of the mark.

Mods: Sorry, naturally evolved thread, I won't say any more OT. :)

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mike S »

It was interesting seeing how Alan Humphries' smoking habit was tackled in series 3 - merely as an example of boys-will-be-boys foolishness, rather than A Big Important Issue With Factsheets. It probably had more effect in discouraging smoking as a result, because it didn't talk down to the viewers - it just made it clear that if you're a smoker then you'll have a rotten time on school trips.

I adored Grange Hill as a kid, but I'm always taken aback by how bad it is when I rewatch episodes. I can handle the ropey child-acting, it's the scripts that are really shocking - there's just no structure to them; storylines meander all over the place, and not in a good way. I watched one Tucker episode on YouTube a while back - 20 minutes of pointless longueurs and nothing happening, then it just fizzled out.

Grange Hill was also the first show which made me aware of directing - or more to the point, Directing with a capital D. From the mid 80s onwards, there seemed to be a lot of 'Look, we're panning across to something significant, just like in a film' self-consciousness going on, which gave me the irrits even as an 11-year-old.

That said, I would buy a complete 1978-1987ish boxset like a shot. But I'd want to watch them in crisp video, please - those accidentally-filmised DVDs looked bloody awful.

RobinCarmody
625 lines
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:53 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by RobinCarmody »

RayB wrote:Exactly. The school I was at in London (which is famed for being "The worst school in England" at one point) had abolished CP long before the national ban. I could tell you tales of rioting, violence, crime and total unruliness. Contrast that to the school I moved to in Hampshire over the course of a weekend - everyone in uniform, polite, quiet, respectful and great educational pedigree. Oh, and they still had CP, too...
I don't want this thread to go off-topic, but I think this might have had more to do with the difference in the social make-up and background etc. of the schools' respective intakes than with the fact that one had corporal punishment and the other didn't.

RayB
405 lines
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:30 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by RayB »

RobinCarmody wrote:
RayB wrote:Exactly. The school I was at in London (which is famed for being "The worst school in England" at one point) had abolished CP long before the national ban. I could tell you tales of rioting, violence, crime and total unruliness. Contrast that to the school I moved to in Hampshire over the course of a weekend - everyone in uniform, polite, quiet, respectful and great educational pedigree. Oh, and they still had CP, too...
I don't want this thread to go off-topic, but I think this might have had more to do with the difference in the social make-up and background etc. of the schools' respective intakes than with the fact that one had corporal punishment and the other didn't.
If you know the history involved then you'd understand. But I expect you don't. On either count. The latter school went rapidly downhill once the complete make-up were of the "can't touch me" generation. The former was closed in the 90's and demolished in the early 00's. On the site now stands one of the new "academy" schools. Same social make up as in the 80's, but with a different mindset. Don't try and turn this into one of your political rants, it won't wash.

sixpennypiece
405 lines
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2013 10:10 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by sixpennypiece »

I finally got round to transferring all my VHS recordings of the series to dvd a couple of years ago . I started recording it off air in 1990 thanks to BSB re-igniting my interest in the old episodes so thanks to the BSB and BBC2 repeats and BBC1 screenings I continued to record it and get a complete run although I did have to borrow the 2 Xmas specials as they never got repeated.
Switched to S-VHS for series 24's move into widescreen and to dvd from series 26 onwards.
Watched them all over a period of several months and still rank the Series 6 Gripper/ racism season as the best .
Zammo/ drugs 3 years later also stands up very well.
Some of the actors were quite poor in every era but the stories kept the interest up .
The only series I actually had to give up on was the last one - series 31 as it had been changed to a show for young kids in an attempt to stop the inevitable axe - but it was awful.
Even after the move to Liverpool from series 26 it did build up some good characters .
Don't think it was coincidence that Grange Hill was axed around the time Waterloo Road started as that series was airing the sort of stories GH should have been airing but couldn't because of the timeslot.

RobinCarmody
625 lines
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:53 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by RobinCarmody »

RayB wrote:On the site now stands one of the new "academy" schools. Same social make up as in the 80's, but with a different mindset.
Indeed.

But doesn't that "different mindset" show that it is possible to turn around failing inner-city schools without corporal punishment? Many such schools have been changed fundamentally and for the better without that option being open to them.

I understand entirely why many inner-city schools got as bad as they did at that point in our recent history. I just don't think the retention of corporal punishment would have been a panacea to make them miraculously better.

(re. the original post - I think there were a lot of teachers of Mr Bronson's generation and ilk in the 1980s who were ill at ease with girls having expected to spend their whole career in all-boys' grammar schools, and weren't really comfortable with mixed comprehensives. See also Mr Scruton in Adrian Mole, and specifically the way he addresses Pandora by her surname in the TV series.)

Billy
405 lines
Posts: 89
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2012 3:20 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Billy »

As a child of the 1990s I'm not sure I've ever met anyone of my age group who ever actually watched it, or at least ever mentioned it.

Like Byker Grove I'd watch to hear the theme tune and then turn over.

User avatar
Mickey
625 lines
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:45 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mickey »

The whole lot was posted on YouTube a few years back, and I watched a huge swathe of it then. To me it seemed a bit dull and directionless to begin with. The cast was still very small, and there wasn't a lot going on. It really seemed to take off in around 1980, when the year containing Stewpot, Pogo, Precious and Gripper joined. That was when it really seemed to find itself, and the interesting stuff began. There was the abusive PE teacher, Gripper's various reigns of terror, and then a little later Zammo and Jonah. I enjoyed it well into the eighties. Robbie and Ziggy were very good, although Imelda, whilst starting out as a promising bully, descended more into comedy as she went along. Then suddenly Stewpot's year vanished halfway through the sixth form, and a whole new third year was introduced, containing some of the worst actors I've seen in the show. Ant Jones, step up and take a bow. His "battle" with Mr Bronson never rang true for me as a kid. As an adult I side firmly with Bronson. Horrible, whiny boy, constantly sulking and causing trouble! There are times when what had previously been children acting naturally as children suddenly become somebody's idea of cool, rebellious types, and it all falls flat. I eventually ducked out during the donkey storyline.

I think the portrayal of changing times within schools was accurate enough, though. I started secondary school in '86, and there was a lot of the increasingly liberal approach, with a few older teachers pining for the old ways. Your Mr Bronson types tended to be quite popular, as long as they were fair as well as strict. Baxter, too - a good example of the sort of teacher who can bring a class in line with one quick bellow. I was sorry to see him go. Rather amusingly, he vanishes right after declaring his unswerving loyalty to Mrs McCluskey!

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mike S »

Billy wrote:As a child of the 1990s I'm not sure I've ever met anyone of my age group who ever actually watched it, or at least ever mentioned it.

Like Byker Grove I'd watch to hear the theme tune and then turn over.
In the 80s, it was pretty much essential viewing - you were weird if you didn't watch it.

The 'Just Say No' campaign was much mocked, but it completely worked on me.

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mike S »

Mickey wrote:The whole lot was posted on YouTube a few years back
Blimey, and they appear to still be there. [EDIT: Actually, not quite.]
Then suddenly Stewpot's year vanished halfway through the sixth form, and a whole new third year was introduced, containing some of the worst actors I've seen in the show. Ant Jones, step up and take a bow. His "battle" with Mr Bronson never rang true for me as a kid. As an adult I side firmly with Bronson.
I was always quite fond of school spiv Gonch Gardener and his toast racket.

User avatar
Mickey
625 lines
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:45 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mickey »

Mike S wrote:The 'Just Say No' campaign was much mocked, but it completely worked on me.
Were you offered drugs at school? I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and that sort of thing always seemed wildly exotic. The bullying storylines always seemed far more real.
Mike S wrote:I was always quite fond of school spiv Gonch Gardener and his toast racket.
Gonch never quite worked for me. Too improbable, I think. Previously there had been Pogo's money-making schemes, which actually seemed like the kind of thing that a schoolboy might get up to. Gonch used to break into scrap yards and make off with tons of weird stuff. What was he going to do with all?! Plus he was mixed up in too many of the "comedy" storylines. I never did like them.

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mike S »

Mickey wrote: Were you offered drugs at school?
No, and I never met anyone of my generation who was. It put me off for life though.

But I agree that the Gripper storylines resonated a lot more.

SgtPepper
625 lines
Posts: 302
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2013 12:37 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by SgtPepper »

In 2006 I ratherly foolishly agreed to attempt to put a DVD set together for someone. Having acquired all the episodes from varying sources there was little option but to watch them all to check for quality and completeness. At the time there'd been 29 of the eventual 31 series so it was a lot of watching. At the time I'd seen nothing beyond the first half of series 14 so it was interesting to see so many new characters and watch them grow (or mysteriously disappear) in such a short space of time. Having already been in the 5th year when it started I don't really "have an era". I did continue to watch it into the early 90's though, albeit with gaps. I don't share the fondness for the likes of Zammo, Gonch and Pogo, mainly because none of them could act to save their granny. I found there was always a saving a grace in each series despite the silly storylines and cartoon characters - for example Mauler and Mr Hargreaves. The move to Liverpool which seemingly removed Grange Hill from North London to some generic unknown part of the country was rather silly (to put it mildly) - especially when Emma Bolton ran away to London. I agree with a previous poster that series 31 was completely ridiculous. The reappearance of Tucker in the final episode at least gave it some sort of link with past, especially when Tigger dug up a time capsule from 1978 buried by Tucker with a picture of himself from 1982.

User avatar
Nick Cooper 625
D-MAC
Posts: 968
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:42 am
Location: Hither Green, London
Contact:

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

Mickey wrote:
Mike S wrote:The 'Just Say No' campaign was much mocked, but it completely worked on me.
Were you offered drugs at school? I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and that sort of thing always seemed wildly exotic. The bullying storylines always seemed far more real.
The inherent problem with that sort of thing especially at the time was that it was a subject the vast majority of school pupils in the country would have no contact with in real life, and for those that actually did, it was so steeped in the standard horror story stereotypes that it can have little real effect, even with them. "Just Say No" was always a flawed concept, because it treated "drugs" as a single amorphous threat, in which there is a supposed equivalence between all illegal substances. The danger of that is that when some kid gets handed their first joint, and they don't go all Reefer Madness as a result, they're then less inclined to believe the horror stories about other substances, even the few that are a virtual guarantee to self-destruction.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

User avatar
Bob Richardson
625 lines
Posts: 493
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:47 pm
Location: Gallifrey west

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Bob Richardson »

I was 22 when Grange Hill started, so rather beyond their target age group. I do recall a visit from the costume designer on the series in late 1977 or early 1978. She popped in to my office in the Spur at TVC to ask if I knew anyone who could print a couple of dozen school badges to be sewn on to blazers for kids for a new drama series. Sadly I couldn't help her, but the school series turned out to be Grange Hill.

Was it Clive James who referred to the series as "Grine Jill"?
"Forfar 5 - East Fife 4"

GarethR
HD
Posts: 1160
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:18 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by GarethR »

For a very long time, mainly because I never got a proper look at it, I thought that the original Grange Hill school badge said "SS". I was genuinely puzzled about why.

Image

Mike S
D-MAC
Posts: 725
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:05 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by Mike S »

Yeah, I always wondered about that. I thought for a while it was two dollar signs.

I rewatched the first episode of series five (5/1/82) on YouTube last night, the one that kicked off the whole Gripper/Roland storyline. Sadly the rest of the series isn't up there. Curious that they appeared to eschew studio sets at this point, with the whole thing shot on film - anyone know why that was? Was the rest of the run the same?

By the way, is it true that Michelle 'Trisha Yates' Herbert now works as a receptionist for her husband's double glazing firm in Dundee? Or is that an internet myth that was scotched many years ago?

GarethR
HD
Posts: 1160
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:18 pm

Re: Grange Hill

Post by GarethR »

When I did a shoot with Todd Carty about 10 years ago we naturally ended up chatting about GH, and he mentioned that Michelle Herbert had long since got out of acting and was enjoying raising a family. It's perfectly possible that she's doing stuff for her husband's business. Now that I come to think of it, Todd did mention that she lived in Scotland.

Post Reply