The Death of BBC Three

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GarethR
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by GarethR »

Nick Cooper 625 wrote: There's no need to be facetious
I can't help it. You do come across as if you're living in Amish Britain at times.
The Ofcom figures show that 24% are still using solely non-HD kit
So 76% are HD-capable? That's quite a convincing majority, wouldn't you say?
Well, if you have been paying attention you'll know that I live in inner London, not out in the wilderness, and obviously we do use catch-up services and the occasional bit of other streaming, but it's definitely the minority of our viewing
No, I haven't been paying attention. But that wasn't the point you were trying to make about broadband, was it?

You said "Even so, the news today was full of stories about those who don't have a fast broadband connection, and that can mean as much isolated rural communities as the centre of cities, even London".

You were clearly talking about availability of broadband connections fast enough to be used for VOD. As I pointed out, 2Mb connections aren't even considered fast, never mind superfast, yet they're good enough for DTT-quality VOD, and they are available to 97% of UK households.

Sure, whether households choose to use them for VOD is a separate issue. But for the massively overwhelming majority of households, there is no infrastructural barrier. The option is there if they wish to use it.

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Nick Cooper 625
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

GarethR wrote:
Nick Cooper 625 wrote: There's no need to be facetious
I can't help it. You do come across as if you're living in Amish Britain at times.
Or maybe that's because you seem like you view anyone with AV equipment less than 18 months old as being technologically impoverished?
The Ofcom figures show that 24% are still using solely non-HD kit
So 76% are HD-capable? That's quite a convincing majority, wouldn't you say?
No, in my line of work I would say that 24% is a statistically significant minority. The Ofcom figures also show that a sizable chunk of people with HD TVs don't have access to a HDTV service, to a tune of around one out of every five.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

GarethR
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

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Nick Cooper 625 wrote: Or maybe that's because you seem like you view anyone with AV equipment less than 18 months old as being technologically impoverished?
Where did you pluck 18 months from, out of interest? Consumer HDMI equipment has been around for a decade now.
No, in my line of work I would say that 24% is a statistically significant minority
What about the 3% who can't get a 2Mb broadband connection and hence can't use VOD even if they want to (assuming they don't have a rural broadband provider offering a wireless service)? Is there a statistical significance to them, or are they really too small a minority to make a meaningful difference?

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Nick Cooper 625
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by Nick Cooper 625 »

GarethR wrote:
Nick Cooper 625 wrote: Or maybe that's because you seem like you view anyone with AV equipment less than 18 months old as being technologically impoverished?
Where did you pluck 18 months from, out of interest? Consumer HDMI equipment has been around for a decade now.
Where did you pluck penny-farthings and tin cans and string from? Yes, a decade after which there are still 24% of households without it. And a 24% which Ofcom reckons isn't decreasing much any time soon.
No, in my line of work I would say that 24% is a statistically significant minority
What about the 3% who can't get a 2Mb broadband connection and hence can't use VOD even if they want to (assuming they don't have a rural broadband provider offering a wireless service)? Is there a statistical significance to them, or are they really too small a minority to make a meaningful difference?
Given the overall size of the population, it most certainly is significant.
"Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo." [Wells]

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David Boothroyd
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by David Boothroyd »

Wasn't much of a send-off at 3.55 AM. Gavin and Stacey s3e1 ended, there was a trail, and then it cut to an animated caption saying the channel had gone online only.

David Plaice
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by David Plaice »

There was more of a send-off just before Gavin and Stacey, with a piece to camera from James Corden thanking BBC3 (sorry, ll!) for giving him and many others their first chance in TV. I could still only manage about 10 minutes of G&S though before bailing out. Never got into that series.

David Plaice
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by David Plaice »

Going back to an earlier part of this thread, this Guardian article includes the following 'exchange':
I thought it was the at-times-good, at-times-awkward marriage of BBC Television and yoof kulcha? It can be two things. And now it can be anything, because an exciting new dawn beckons online!

What kind of new dawn? I thought their budget had been cut from £85m to £25m? Well yes, but to quote from the BBC again: “On Tuesday 16 February, BBC3 will switch from a linear broadcast channel to an online first destination.”

From a what to a what now? From a TV channel to a website.

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bent_halo
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by bent_halo »

Oh God. Never mind BBC3, is Pass Notes still a thing?

Adam McLean
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by Adam McLean »

David Boothroyd wrote:Wasn't much of a send-off at 3.55 AM. Gavin and Stacey s3e1 ended, there was a trail, and then it cut to an animated caption saying the channel had gone online only.

Well, weirdly they're still broadcasting programmes, with continuity announcements and everything very early in the mornings. Not quite dead yet.

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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by JWG »

The close-down's had 9,000 views in five days; an argument for bringing the channel back,surely!

voyager
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by voyager »

Won't be missed. I see the late evening repeats of EastEnders have been taken over by W, wonder if they'll do the same with Dr Who when it returns.

Brock
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by Brock »

JWG wrote:The close-down's had 9,000 views in five days; an argument for bringing the channel back,surely!
When the BBC announced that they were closing down the old Radio 5 (to replace it with Radio 5 Live) its listening figures went up, apparently because it was the first time that many people had heard of the station.

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Private Frazer
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by Private Frazer »

The metro reported today that some programmes are going to be on the iplayer before the TV and I think there's one tonight that is on BBC2 at 10pm. I think this is a bad move for TV.
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drmih
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Re: The Death of BBC Three

Post by drmih »

Private Frazer wrote:The metro reported today that some programmes are going to be on the iplayer before the TV and I think there's one tonight that is on BBC2 at 10pm. I think this is a bad move for TV.
Wasn't the first season of Peter Kay's Car Share released in this way, and technically you could say the same of the Ripper Street now, albeit on a pay service 'iplayer' before BBC 1. More and more people are getting used to 'binge' watching box sets, through recommendations after the original transmission, and therefore new commissions are playing to this demand on Netflix, Amazon etc even on the first showing. It works for me, as I'm impatient, and for gripping drama I just want to keep on watching.

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