Your childhood comics.

From Buster to Wizard (I couldn't think of any comics beginning with 'A' and 'Z'...)
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Beaker
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Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

I was one of those odd children that if given a few pennies to go the sweetshop at the bottom of our street (called Johnny Cack's for some reason) would come back with a copy of The Beezer or Topper instead.

As regular comics I had Shiver & Shake then Monster Fun (I still have all of the Badtime Bedtime books) and my Grandad always bought the Dandy and, in later years, The Beano for me.......mainly so he could read them first. :-)

Later I graduated to Starlord then 2000ad mopping up the 2000ad issues I'd missed within a couple of years. I still have 2000ad every week.

We also went to a lot of jumble sales and I would like nothing better than to pick up a big pile of Whizzer & Chips or Buster to read.

So, what was everyone else's weekly comicy-type treat?
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

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Jezza
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Jezza »

I went through a Marvel phase in the early 80's, bought Future Tense, Team Up, Forces in Combat and Valour, last Marvel comic i got was Secret Wars in 1986.

The rest of the family had The Dandy, Beano and nearly all the IPC comics (I have inherited a large quanity of Jinty from my sister for some reason!)

My mum used to buy me Doctor Who Weekly when it started, couldn't wait for friday afternoon when school ended to read it!

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Beaker
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

Yeah, I have at least the first issues of Future Tense and Forces .. in the loft along with about the first few of the Doctor Who weekly. Dave Gibbons' artwork on the opening Iron Legion story is fantastic.
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

orlock
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by orlock »

I do have early memories of Mighty World of Marvel no 1 back in Oct 1972 but I guess I didnt show enough interest for my parents to continue with it. However when Shiver and Shake came along in March 1973 I bought it avidly. This led me reading most of IPC's humour comic output at the time - Whoopee, Shiver and Shake and Buster (later Krazey, Cheeky, Monster Fun). I do remember getting Dracula Lives for 30 or so issues (I lost interest when they dropped the Frankenstein strip) and also again for a brief period bought Superheroes (reprints of Silver surfer). I also bought about the first 15 issues of 2000Ad, plus some Bullet and Action. But in the main I stayed with the humour comics until around 1976/77 when I got hooked on Spiderman (Marvel UK). I then dropped the IPC range and turned into a marvel zombie buying everything Marvel UK related including all the back issues of MWOM, Spiderman, Avengers etc. to build up a complete collection of Marvel UK. This lasted until around 1981 when my tastes changed towards music, film, pub etc. I never did go for Beano or Dandy for some reason and neither for the likes of the Battle, Valiant war-action range. Which is strange as I now have subscriptions for the Beano (bought for my young boys of course ;-) ), 2000Ad and any old issue of Battle I can get my hands on. I did give up my IPC collection around '79 only to regret this. Later I did make some amends by buying a full collection of Shiver and Shake and Monster Fun from a certain online auction site in its early days. I still have a very big soft spot for humour comics today and am very happy scouring around for and reading classics by Ken Reid and Leo Baxendale.

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Mark »

Not surprisingly, it was all the TV ones that were on regular order, TV Comic, TV21, Countdown/TV Action, and my fav, Look-In.

Of the others, it was the usual suspects, Beano, Dandy, Topper, Beezer, Whizzer and Chips, and one of my favs, Cor!.

Aside from the Annuals, the Christmas editions , seemed very special.

With Look-In, it was a piece of artwork with lots of TV characters in a snow filled background, usually, and it would really put you in a festive mood.!
"A cup of Tea....Tea...Tea"

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Richard Charles Skryngestone
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Richard Charles Skryngestone »

Dandy and Whizzer and Chips. Then onto 2000AD. Then that was basically the end of comics for me. I did try out the tedious "Crisis", produced by the same people as 2000 AD, but never enjoyed it. Maybe I was too old for it then. or maybe it was because it was complete rubbish.
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Alabaster Russmore
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Alabaster Russmore »

Like many, TV21 was the first comic I recall actually having delivered. However, by about 68 / 69 I must have switched as I seem to recall getting the very first issue of Whizzer & Chips. I really fell for the two comics in one thing. I think the first two or three issues has free gifts. I remember getting the first issue of Cor! which weirdly had a free 'Kool Aid' style drink on the cover. Or something like that.

In August of that year we moved to the USA and comic book heaven for the next four glorious years. Being obsessed with Dark Shadows I started getting the Gold Key of that, plus Famous Monsters if my parents were feeling generous plus 'mad' style comics like 'Spoof' which I still have.

Since that time I have amassed a huge digital collection of comics (circa 1TB) and read a couple every day.

Indeed yesterday I picked up the Tin TIn collection in hardback in Waterstones - my only purchase in the 'sales' (£45 - with a so-called £75 off). Kids don't love comics the way they used to in general - but then they have access to TV on their mobiles so why bother making the effort to read 'storyboards'? a shame really as it remains a source of great pleasure for me...

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by ctraynor »

TV Comic with colour Dr Who in it from early 1968.

Immediately replaced this with Countdown featuring Who and Anderson (wowsers) in early 1971.
More and more British Marvels from late 1972 onwards. Finally stopped getting them regularly in early '76, possibly to the relief of my parents.

Starburst from issue 2 in early '78 (containing a gushing review of Close Encounters Of The Third Kind from Ray Bradbury, no less, and what is still one of the best, certainly the first, articles on The Prisoner.

Q magazine from its first issue in 1986. The kind of music mag I'd been looking for ("much razzle and no shortage of dazzle"..."a situation clearly requiring much zip and no little amount of zing"...

Viz from summer '86 for about five years, then sporadically.

Dr Who Classic Comics from late '92 (full circle back to Countdown!)

perov
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by perov »

I started with Dandy, and for a while I was a Hornet reader before I graduated to NME.

In the Hornet I have a vague recollection about football story and a purple cloud, that engulfed the best players who were then taken by this madman to try and produce the best football team in the world.

Am I dreaming or does anyone else remember this?

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Bodie »

I used to get:
Cheeky, Whoopee, Nutty, Tops, Jackpot, Starblazer digest, Mad magazine, Beano digests

My brother used to get:
2000AD, the new Eagle, Scream, Wow, Buster, Whizzer & Chips, The Phantom. He was also into various Marvel comics of which I can remember very few (Fantastic Four, Uncanny X-men, Spiderman, Ghost Rider).

We used to go to the newsagent on pocket money day, read our comics then swap and read each others.

We'd also read Harvey comics stuff (Richie Rich, Sad Sack, Little Lotta), Archie comics and anything else we could pick up second hand, such as collections of Wizard of Id, Hagar the Horrible and Garfield.

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Richard Charles Skryngestone
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Richard Charles Skryngestone »

ctraynor wrote:TV Comic with colour Dr Who in it from early 1968.

Immediately replaced this with Countdown featuring Who and Anderson (wowsers) in early 1971.
More and more British Marvels from late 1972 onwards. Finally stopped getting them regularly in early '76, possibly to the relief of my parents.

Starburst from issue 2 in early '78 (containing a gushing review of Close Encounters Of The Third Kind from Ray Bradbury, no less, and what is still one of the best, certainly the first, articles on The Prisoner.

Q magazine from its first issue in 1986. The kind of music mag I'd been looking for ("much razzle and no shortage of dazzle"..."a situation clearly requiring much zip and no little amount of zing"...

Viz from summer '86 for about five years, then sporadically.

Dr Who Classic Comics from late '92 (full circle back to Countdown!)
Do Q and Viz count as comics? Viz I understand. I also got Viz for years. I also got a few issues of the Viz copycats, but was never impressed with them(there was a thread at the old forum). If we're doing music mags as well, then I must admit to having got Smash Hits!
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Beaker
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

Richard Charles Skryngestone wrote: Do Q and Viz count as comics? Viz I understand.
I don't know what Q is...but I still buy Viz very occasionally and had the latest annual for Christmas.....'tis good. :o)
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

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Shaqui
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Shaqui »

Where do I start?

My earliest comic memory is of the 'Star Trek' strip in 'Joe 90: Top Secret'. I'm fairly certain I continued to get it after the merger with 'TV21' as I recall some of the Mike Noble strips. From there I graduated to 'Look-in', on and off for about 15 years or so but also had 'Countdown'/'TV Action'. Other titles I may have dallied with were 'Jet' and 'Thunder', and my father - who was also a big comic fan and started my interest in 'Dan Dare' and 'The Trigan Empire by buying me (*ahem*) the 1974 annuals for both (and still have!) - bought a big box of a run of a comic. I forget the actual title but a strip in it was 'The Voice from Mars'?

In the early 80s I did also get 'TV Tops' for a period, and 'Beeb' in 1985 for the first 11 of its 20 issues.

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Shaqui
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Shaqui »

ctraynor wrote:Starburst from issue 2 in early '78 (containing a gushing review of Close Encounters Of The Third Kind from Ray Bradbury, no less, and what is still one of the best, certainly the first, articles on The Prisoner.
I got Starburst from the very first issue, and got it on and off for many years. Didn't the first two issues feature the entire run of the Jeff Hawke strip 'Here Be Tygers'?

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Mark C Bale
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Mark C Bale »

Comic-wise I certainly recall TV21 on a regular basis, occasionally would get the Beano and Dandy. But I used to buy a comic called "Cor!" every week. Also used to love the Annuals every year too.

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Shaqui
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Post by Shaqui »

Mention of 'Cor!' has made me recall I think I got 'Monster Fun' for a period when it first launched, as I remember the 'Badtime Bedtime Storybooks' that you pulled out and made.

Fickle, me.

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by ctraynor »

Shaqui wrote:Where do I start?

My earliest comic memory is of the 'Star Trek' strip in 'Joe 90: Top Secret'. I'm fairly certain I continued to get it after the merger with 'TV21' as I recall some of the Mike Noble strips. From there I graduated to 'Look-in',.
Yes, of course, I got a complete run at the time of Joe 90: Top Secret, from early 1969 wasn't it? My mum must have just ditched the lot, or given them to our local children's home. My sister got a complete run of Look-in for the first five or six months ie early 1971, (she loved Timeslip's Spencer Banks) I think, while I got Countdown at the same time. They all got ditched as well. I might seek all that stuff out. Just think, Timeslip in colour drawn by Mike Noble.
There was something magical about all this wasn't there. Dr Who in colour in Countdown with a more serious approach, just like the TV version. Golden age. I've still got my Countdowns but some are mutilated as I foolishly agreed at the time to let my sister cut out all the colour pix of Tony Curtis, then in The Persuaders! (she loved Tony Curtis).

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Mark C Bale
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Mark C Bale »

I remember buying COR! but can't for the life of me remember any of the contents.

Was there some sort of comic called "Pippins" or something similar, it rings a bell with me. Would have been mid 60s.

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Shaqui
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Shaqui »

Mark C Bale wrote:I remember buying COR! but can't for the life of me remember any of the contents.

Was there some sort of comic called "Pippins" or something similar, it rings a bell with me. Would have been mid 60s.
Yes, Pippin. A junior companion to TV Comic, from the same publisher Polystyle, and named AFAIR after the young adopted son of Mr and Mrs Pogle.

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Mark C Bale
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Mark C Bale »

Yes seems familiar. TV Comic and TV21 were also probably regular buys for me too. Possibly even the Lady Penelope comic

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Shaqui
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Shaqui »

ctraynor wrote:My sister got a complete run of Look-in for the first five or six months ie early 1971, (she loved Timeslip's Spencer Banks) I think, while I got Countdown at the same time. They all got ditched as well. I might seek all that stuff out. Just think, Timeslip in colour drawn by Mike Noble.
Yep. http://www.timeslip.org.uk/comics/caveman1.php

I helped to complete the colour run with scans on the Timeslip website from my own complete run of the first year of 'Look-in'. A shame they decided not to continue with any of the b/w strips, even if inferior.

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Bodie »

Mark C Bale wrote:I remember buying COR! but can't for the life of me remember any of the contents.
I recall COR! had a strip based on the Goodies. I'd love to see these all collected up and released, perhaps (to garner a further audience) in a flip-over double front cover version that reprinted all the Hancock strips from Film Fun.

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Beaker
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Post by Beaker »

Bodie wrote:
Mark C Bale wrote:I remember buying COR! but can't for the life of me remember any of the contents.
I recall COR! had a strip based on the Goodies. I'd love to see these all collected up and released, perhaps (to garner a further audience) in a flip-over double front cover version that reprinted all the Hancock strips from Film Fun.
It is odd that very few old British comics, apart from 2000ad and Commando comics, get comprehensive reprints. I’m sure some of the more popular strips wouldn’t cost a great deal to compile, unless there are legal or ownership issues preventing this.

There must be a market for them as the chap on Ebay selling DVD’s stuffed full of comics is doing a roaring trade.
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

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Shaqui
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Shaqui »

Beaker wrote:There must be a market for them as the chap on Ebay selling DVD’s stuffed full of comics is doing a roaring trade.
Illegally one might add. There might well be a market but the cost of, say, licensing a proper reprint book would presumably cost more than the few pounds he is asking, having ripped off fans who scanned them for free, shared them for free online, and which he copied and is profiting from. Easy money, when you don't actually do any of the purchasing, collecting, scanning or spend your own time over a product, bar duplicating CDs or DVDs.

Steve Williams
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Steve Williams »

Richard Charles Skryngestone wrote:Do Q and Viz count as comics?
Well, I had loads of stuff on order at the local newsagent right up until I went to university, and they would forever be referred to in my family as "the comics", right up to the very end when they included Q and Private Eye.

I more or less bought every humour comic published in the eighties, having them all on order in the newsagents. My earliest memories of comics are things like the Pippin, Play-Hour and Buttons, and I remember we had a frieze we'd collected from several issues of Play-Hour around our "toy room" (ie, a cupboard under the stairs we kept our toys in). I also remember the last knockings of TV Comic. My first proper comic was The Beano, which I remember buying in Wrexham Asda at the age of five. The following year I bought Buster and Whizzer and Chips for the first time, and they were the first three comics I had on a regular order. By this point I was also reading my sister's Care Bears and Get Along Gang comics as well, often before she did.

I remember adding Oink (which I absolutely loved) and The Topper to the order in 1986, and I remember we'd get the Beano and Topper on a Tuesday and Buster and Whizzer and Chips on a Friday, they were the official comic days. I also had Hoot for the five minutes that lasted, and when they merged with The Dandy I started getting The Dandy, but I was never crazy about that and I remember I stopped it after a year to start getting Look-In. Somewhere along the line I started getting it again, though. Smash Hits arrived the following year, when I was nine, after I'd bought a copy to read on holiday in Majorca and I thought it was brilliant, the funniest thing I'd ever read.

I think the acme of my comic reading was in 1988/89, when I was ten, when I think I had on order in the newsagents The Beano, Buster, Whizzer and Chips, The Topper, The Dandy, possibly The Beezer, Oink and Look-In, all weekly, then Smash Hits fortnightly. Fast Forward arrived at the end of 1989 and both my sister and I got our own copies, that's how much we liked it (I think I defected from Look-In to start getting it). Natural wastage meant that was the most I ever got as they then started closing down - Beezer and Topper merged and Whizzer and Chips ended, which left a space for Look-In again, and Number One sneaked in as well.

I'm pretty sure I gave up most of the comics - or at least, those that still existed - by the time I was about thirteen, though I clung on for probably a bit too long to some of them. I couldn't bear to stop getting the Beano for ages because it was the first I'd ever bought, though I would rarely properly read it all the way through, though I finally gave it up at the age of sixteen, when it was beyond a joke. I think I might have stopped getting it almost the exact same time I started reading Private Eye. I hung on to Smash Hits until I was in my twenties, mind. I did cling on to stuff far too long, like how I kept watching The Big Breakfast long after it had gone rubbish.

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Beaker
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

And don't you wish you'd kept those comics?

I kept some but only started seriously collecting when Star Wars Weekly came out. In fact three feet away from me right now are two box files with my handwriting on from 1978 containing issues 1-45 then 46-86!
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

Cole
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Cole »

I went through so many phases with comics that I probably bought each title, at some point, from about 1972/3 onwards. But this did tend towards the Whizzer and Chips, Whoopee, Shiver and Shake types with the odd Topper and Beezer thrown in. I don't recall liking The Dandy particularly but there would be an occasional dally with The Beano.

There was also a period, in the mid-seventies, where I was getting every title as one of my dad's friends worked for a newspaper wholesaler and used to dish out the overstock to his pals in the pub.

At this time, however, I was also getting into Superman comics and would scour the local newsagents and Popular Book Exchanges (chain of book exchanges) for Superman, Action Comics and Lois Lane titles of which I amassed quite a lot. Then, almost overnight I lost interest in Superman. I seem to recall that I took all of my Superman comics to the Popular Book Exchange, in Balham, and swapped them for, amoungst other things, a Perishers Omnibus and a Spiderman Treasury Edition. The allegiance had changed to Spiderman.

As a result of this, my British comic buying changed from Monster Fun/Krazy etc to Super Spiderman (had a letter published in that one in 1978) in the late seventies which lasted up until the early eighties along with other Marvel re-print titles such as Star Wars and the Hulk. Doctor Who weekly was never missed either.

Although things were building up to this, it was 1979 that things really changed as, I think following an advert in Doctor Who Weekly or Starburst, I got my Dad to take me to Forebidden Planet when it was still in Denmark Street. Therefore, in the next few years, I became a collector of American comics; even managing to get the Holy Grail of my peer group, Star Wars number one.

Of my collecting, I still have every US Spiderman that I bought (the 70's Russ Andru period being my favourite) and a few issues of other Marvel titles: Star Wars, Fantastic Four, Daredevil etc. The last American title I bought was the Amazing Spiderman 7/11 issue.

Of my UK comic buying, I have virtually nothing left, except for a pull out mini-Cormic featuring Ivor Lott and Tony Broke, the 1977 Krazy Diary, Krazy number one and Plugg number one. I had a small number of Sparkys but gave those to a friend, a few years ago, who had a particular love of that title.

Now, I'm finding that I'm getting a bit nostalgic about the British comics and wish that I'd taken to them for a bit longer than I did. If I come across any of these titles now, in second hand shops etc, I'd buy them in an instant. I still regret not plundering a pile of Knockouts that I saw on a day trip to The Lanes in Brighton, in 2003. But then, it was a day out duirng a new relationship and I couldn't be carting a load of comics about on a romantic day by the seaside! I know that there is much to see on ebay but storage is a bit of an issue but I have bought a few annuals, to replace ones I had as a child, from there.

At the end of it all, the UK comics were my early comic interest but the American ones were when I took it all very seriously and started to properly collect them. It was deemed that there was no value in an old copy of Buster and Jet but paying twenty pence for the Amazing Spiderman that introduced The Punisher...

But then one can't put a price on nostalgia. Bah!

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by ctraynor »

Just been browsing through altered vistas and lapping up the happy memories of Saturday morning comics. Although I love Countdown comic forever, there were some poor choices of covers weren't there? Balloons, toy rockets, racing cars... I much preferred the science fiction covers advertising the new Dr Who or UFO story inside.

As an old friend of mine (now with a PhD in some aspect of nuclear physics) said to me years ago: "No, Chris mate. Hate science fact. It's last".)

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Doom Patrol »

Like a few others I wouldn't know where to start. I was a voracious reader of comics, British and American and US comic books gradually edged out the British titles. I'd always bought DC comics, mostly, and on a sporadic basis, but when they started reprinting them in the form of Fantastic and Terrific the die was cast. With hindsight I regret losing track of things like TV21. Although, I've made up for that since. I think the last comics I bought were something like Infinite Crisis and when they start blurring one into the other it's time to stop.

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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by GarethR »

I had 2000AD and Doctor Who Monthly on order at the newsagent (thanks to the little coupon you could clip - "Dear Newsagent, please reserve/deliver..."), and my Dad would collect them when he went to get the Observer on Sunday mornings. Beyond that I would pick up other comics here and there as the fancy took me (and if I happened to have any pocket money left), and I quickly determined that I liked the Beano, Whizzer & Chips, Krazy and Cheeky, but didn't really like the Dandy, Beezer or Topper - they just didn't seem as entertaining somehow and the illustrations were less appealing.

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