Your childhood comics.

From Buster to Wizard (I couldn't think of any comics beginning with 'A' and 'Z'...)
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Beaker
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

Sat in bed at 1.30 this morning reading a copy of The Dandy from 1979....odd to think that I may have last read it when I was twelve.
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

Lone Dog
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Lone Dog »

Wow, this thread has been a trip down memory lane.

I remember most of the comics mentioned by other members, even thought they have been forgotten in my mind for so many years. There was always such variety in terms of content, and also production quality. You'd have titles printed on high quality paper in colour (TV21, Countdown, Look & Learn) amongst the standard comics. I seem to remember Topper as being larger than the others, broadsheet perhaps?

I enjoyed the Marvel reprints in Fantastic and Terrific, also the funnies (Cor!, Whizzer & Chips), plus the more serious strips (Warlord, Action). Also I remember Pippin, a paper for the younger reader. I recall being very fond of the Disney characters in Donald & Mickey, as well. I think those were reprints of old Carl Barks stuff.

Then Marvel UK started and I bought everything they published for years, supplementing them with the occasional US Marvel that you'd find in a backstreet newsagents, and when you couldn't get Marvels, the black and white Alan Class reprints of what seemed like every strip they could get their hands on.

Now, if only I'd kept everything...

ayrshireman
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by ayrshireman »

The Victor, the Hotspur, Battle, and my favourite, Warlord.

Oh, and being Scottish, Oor Wullie and the Broons. The buying of which by your granny for you for Xmas is, I believe, compulsary by law up here.

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Beaker
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Beaker »

There have been a lot of Oor Wullie/Broons reprint books about lately, being a Black Country lad they never came up on my radar as a kiddie but the artwork is excellent.
If I were creating the world I wouldn't mess about with butterflies and daffodils. I would have started with lasers, eight o'clock, Day One!

ayrshireman
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by ayrshireman »

The Eagle (how could I miss that?...)

Daspouter
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Daspouter »

I started to get comics in 1972, when i was 5 - my regular order, which i would get on a Saturday, and which i used to be ecstatic about, was: Shiver and Shake, Cor!!, TV Comic, Valiant (my fave), Lion, and Spider Man Comics Weekly. I loved getting these every week, and even seeing the covers/logos now brings back memories of what it felt like back then when my Mother would return from the shops and drop them on the settee. As the years passed, my regular orders changed: Monster Fun, Krazy, Dandy, Beano, Planet of the Apes and Dracula Lives were added, while Valiant changed into Battle, Shiver and Shake merged with Whoopee, and Krazy merged with Whizzer and Chips, which i then got every week.

I started getting Starburst in 1979, with issue 12, and Doctor Who Weekly later that year. Eventually i stopped buying British comics in 1982, though i liked Scream and bought all but the first 3 issues which i didnt know about. I also loved, and still do, US comics, especially DC and bought loads of these. I have a great collection now of both UK and US comics.

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liberace
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by liberace »

The first would have been the Beano followed by 2000ad which I still dip into. Along the way in my first decade Marvel and DC made a big impact, and from a my teen years I still fondly recall deadline and similar publications.

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Billy Smart
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Billy Smart »

This is a brilliant (and funny) article by Tom Ewing, especially in the way that it combines readings of narrative, craft and ideology - http://freakytrigger.co.uk/ft/2015/07/l ... schoolboy/

brigham
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by brigham »

I had The Beezer at first, until I was old enough to appreciate The Magnet.

David Savage
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by David Savage »

brigham wrote:I had The Beezer at first, until I was old enough to appreciate The Magnet.
But ... but ... The Beezer started in 1956. The Magnet finished in 1940!

brigham
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by brigham »

David Savage wrote:
brigham wrote:I had The Beezer at first, until I was old enough to appreciate The Magnet.
But ... but ... The Beezer started in 1956. The Magnet finished in 1940!
My father's. Nothing was wasted in our house.

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Bob Richardson
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Bob Richardson »

The Valiant was my weekly fix, together with The Beano and Bunty & Judy (I have a younger sister, so there are fond memories of The Four Marys, Wee Slavey, Petra the Party Maker and Toots). Favourite strip was The Steel Claw (Valiant) and favourite feature (terrifying, because it was presented as fact) was "Do You Believe In Ghosts?".

As an aside, Bunty always featured a paper doll on the back page, with a cut-out wardrobe. In BBC Sport we used to prepare football and rugby round-up graphics for team captions, using a simplified representation of the kit colours. Our graphic designer, Ros Dallas (a fan of D C Thomson comics for girls) dubbed these "Bunties" and the name stuck. We had the rather incongruous spectacle of sessions for FA Cup graphics prep being referred to as a "Bunty day" on the rota.
"Forfar 5 - East Fife 4"

John McE
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by John McE »

My father bought me Film Fun, because he had read it as a lad. But it was taken over by Buster a couple of weeks later. There was a strip in Film Fun called "Space Family Robinson", which was probably my first taste of Sci-fi.

Maxwell Hawke, Ghost Hunter was my favourite strip in Buster (how I wish someone would re-print those strips), and then I also started getting Valiant (The Steel Claw and some Viking bloke with a double bladed axe - can't recall the actual name - was it possibly Black Axe?) and The Lion (Robot Archie). For summer holidays we would sometimes go to stay with relatives in Bournemouth, and my cousin had lots of earlier issues, so always enjoyed pouring through those for stories I hadn't seen.

Then of course TV Century 21 came along, and the others soon went by the wayside. I started buying Lady Penelope as well, until an assistant at the shop I bought it embarrassed me by letting me know I wasn't really buying it for my sister :-)

I bought Countdown when that came along too, but was getting a bit old for comics by then.

And I also used to search the local newsagents for Batman, Detective etc. I remember buying an issue that had the first reappearance of Catwoman, and the first ever issue of The Fantastic Four. If only my mother hadn't forced me to throw them away!!!

brigham
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by brigham »

"Space Family Robinson"! Wow! I'd completely forgotten about that! The TV version was called "Lost in Space", I believe.
Both utter shite.

Richard Bignell
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Richard Bignell »

I have very fond memories of various mystery/adventure stories appearing in 1970s comics and at the end of each week, you'd be asked if you'd spotted the next clue as to what was going on. I'm fairly sure that one comic used to print little slips at the end of each week's edition that you could fill what you'd noticed. I can't for the life of me recall any of the titles or what comics they were in though!

David Savage
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by David Savage »

Richard Bignell wrote:I have very fond memories of various mystery/adventure stories appearing in 1970s comics and at the end of each week, you'd be asked if you'd spotted the next clue as to what was going on. I'm fairly sure that one comic used to print little slips at the end of each week's edition that you could fill what you'd noticed. I can't for the life of me recall any of the titles or what comics they were in though!
Who'd Kill Cockney Robin? in Shiver and Shake did this:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MEsmgMZ3OfE/U ... 01_133.jpg

Eagle Eye from the same comic also asked you if you'd spotted the clue at the end of each week's instalment.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HzzV6Nhnm3k/U ... 29_130.jpg

And then Menace of the Alpha Man; great Eric Bradbury art for this one:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8xNoQoQxOYs/U ... 68_057.jpg

(All links to the Kazoop blog. Click on the pics to increase their size.)

So were probably a Shiver and Shake reader, Richard?

David Savage
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by David Savage »

John McE wrote:My father bought me Film Fun, because he had read it as a lad. But it was taken over by Buster a couple of weeks later. There was a strip in Film Fun called "Space Family Robinson", which was probably my first taste of Sci-fi.
Cheeky Weekly also had a Space Family Robinson serial in the late Seventies, which was quite lively:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_kPJY6uj6pU4/T ... Snatch.jpg

(From the Cheeky Weekly Blog.)

Richard Bignell
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Richard Bignell »

David Savage wrote:So were probably a Shiver and Shake reader, Richard?
That page from Who Killed Cockney Robin sent a strange shiver up my spine. Yes, that's exactly how I remember it and I was indeed a Shiver and Shake man. Got it from the first issue, with my free plastic joke biscuit!

David Savage
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by David Savage »

I got the joke pencil.

You may find lots more spine-shivery (and shake-y) moments around here:
http://kazoop.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/19 ... nd_18.html

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Private Frazer
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Private Frazer »

Lone Dog wrote:Wow, this thread has been a trip down memory lane.

I remember most of the comics mentioned by other members, even thought they have been forgotten in my mind for so many years. There was always such variety in terms of content, and also production quality. You'd have titles printed on high quality paper in colour (TV21, Countdown, Look & Learn) amongst the standard comics...
I remember getting 'Look and Learn' (and the Pen Pal feature comes to mind). I just found quite a few early 60's ones in a charity shop and they have kept well so, as you say, the paper quality must indeed have been good.
"Now listen you guys, I don't wish to alarm you but there's some pretty weird things going on out here..."

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Bob Richardson
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Bob Richardson »

Private Frazer wrote:
Lone Dog wrote:Wow, this thread has been a trip down memory lane.

I remember most of the comics mentioned by other members, even thought they have been forgotten in my mind for so many years. There was always such variety in terms of content, and also production quality. You'd have titles printed on high quality paper in colour (TV21, Countdown, Look & Learn) amongst the standard comics...
I remember getting 'Look and Learn' (and the Pen Pal feature comes to mind). I just found quite a few early 60's ones in a charity shop and they have kept well so, as you say, the paper quality must indeed have been good.
It would have been wood pulp paper (NOT good quality) but if you chuck lots of kaolin clay into the mix and pass it through calendering (heated) rollers you can produce a smooth, glossy (but very cheap) "art" paper which reproduces good quality colour images very well. The inclusion of clay delays, but doesn't stop the deleterious effect of lignin (a naturally-occurring acidic component of wood pulp) which will eventually make the paper very brittle, and it will crumble, but not as quickly as newsprint. Enjoy your "Look & Learn" while you can...
"Forfar 5 - East Fife 4"

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Private Frazer
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Private Frazer »

I looked at the earliest LOOK AND LEARN that I found (No 37) last night and learnt that Captain Cook was killed in Hawaii, that a builder wanting his men to work earlier led eventually to Summer Time, and that the word canter is attributable to Canterbury pilgrims (maybe, can't believe everything I read).

The staples have rusted. I notice that the pages, presumably because of the printing process, beyond the centre of the magazine, all have six punch marks along the edge.
"Now listen you guys, I don't wish to alarm you but there's some pretty weird things going on out here..."

TonyCurrie
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by TonyCurrie »

The first comic I had regularly was Robin, and when I was a bit older, TV Comic. But a friend's Gran would make him keep all his comics, and bundle them up for me - she'd deliver them about once a month and that was a marvellous treat. Piles of Tiger, Lion and some Beezers and Dandys amongst them.

But before long I was lured into the local newsagents (stank of paraffin from a little heater behind the counter) and the wire rack that contained DC and Dell comics. Dell were okay but DC were always better - Superman, World's Finest, Jimmy Olsen, Lois Lane, Action, Adventure, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Legion of Super Heroes, and if you were very lucky, hidden in the rack were a couple of 'Annuals' which were 2/6 instead of 9p and had several decent stories. From there it was downhill all the way - swopping DC comics in the playground (I was once horribly enticed by an exotic black and white Australian Superman comic that Gordon & Gotch had published) and eventually descending into the world of Marvel and its own rather different brand of superheroes (although I always preferred the Fantastic Four to Spiderman for some reason).

Ah, happy days!

(My parents subscribed to the utterly dreary 'Knowledge' magazine - buying me the flippin' binders for my birthday - and for a little while the even worse Look and Learn. Life has its downsides too)

Brian F
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Brian F »

I found a copy of "Harold Hare's Weekly" recently. It hadn't been thrown away because I had sent a letter in about my pet rabbit getting under the grate in the fireplace and coming out covered in ash, that was printed in it. The paper was only just above newsprint in quality as it was a bot thicker.

jno
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by jno »

Does anyone else still own any of these old comics? If anyone does have any TOPS/TV TOPS still around I'd be happy to hear from them.

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Richard Charles Skryngestone
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Richard Charles Skryngestone »

I can remember my mum giving away some of my comics to charity shops, totally without my knowledge, when I was young. Some Tigers and Roy of the Rovers. I was far from pleased. Today, I find that I wish she hadn't, but for a different reason.
Great News Inside, Chums!

Nigel Stapley
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Nigel Stapley »

Coming in late to this whole subject, but I can think of my comic-reading period (roughly 1966-75) featuring at various times the Beano, the Dandy, Beezer, Whizzer & Chips, Knockout (which was later incorporated into W&C, IIRC), Cor!! (Front-page character Gus The Gorilla, with the regular punch-line, "No One Makes A Monkey Out Of Gus!"). One I don't think has been mentioned here yet was Smash!, which was a particular favourite when I was about 7 or 8.

I still have some of the annuals upstairs somewhere (no value, somewhat foxed and often scribbled on), including ones for comics I don't ever remember getting weekly. Which was the one which had an army sergeant in it who would - at the appropriate moment and usually in the face of assault by stereotypical Nazi/Japanese troops - go into A Raging Fury?

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smorodina
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by smorodina »

Nigel Stapley wrote:Coming in late to this whole subject, but I can think of my comic-reading period (roughly 1966-75) featuring at various times the Beano, the Dandy, Beezer, Whizzer & Chips, Knockout (which was later incorporated into W&C, IIRC), Cor!! (Front-page character Gus The Gorilla, with the regular punch-line, "No One Makes A Monkey Out Of Gus!"). One I don't think has been mentioned here yet was Smash!, which was a particular favourite when I was about 7 or 8.

I still have some of the annuals upstairs somewhere (no value, somewhat foxed and often scribbled on), including ones for comics I don't ever remember getting weekly. Which was the one which had an army sergeant in it who would - at the appropriate moment and usually in the face of assault by stereotypical Nazi/Japanese troops - go into A Raging Fury?
That was Captain Hurricane, the lead story in Valiant - also the comic that absorbed Knockout. One of the best children's comics with Kelly's Eye and The Steel Claw amongst others. It also reprinted French comics such as Asterix (renamed Little Fred and Big Ed) and Bill and Boule (A Dog's Life) and a less well know strip called Belloy (Paladin), which I don't think had an English publication other than this.

Smash was one of the 'Power Comics' (Wham, Smash, Pow, Fantastic and Terrific) which reprinted early Marvel super heros and was where I first read them. Smash also had 'Batman' and there were some good british cartoons such as The Swots and the Blots and Grimley Fiendish.
Andy Hurwitz

Nigel Stapley
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by Nigel Stapley »

I had wondered if it was Valiant, but I couldn't visualise the covers of the annuals.

Was there more than one Knockout? I could have sworn that the one I remember was absorbed into Whizzer & Chips, as I said above.

I don't remember any Marvel stuff in Smash, though; only the British funnies that you mentioned (wasn't Ronnie Rich another one of those?).

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smorodina
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Re: Your childhood comics.

Post by smorodina »

Yes, you're right there were two! The second did merge with Wizzer and Chips: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knockout_(UK_comics). There were, in effect, two Smashes as well. The original was published by Odhams and was part of the Power comics series. When these finished they were merged together one by one leaving just Smash and this was taken over by Fleetway. The Marvel content had disappeared by them as Marvel launched their own British comics.
Andy Hurwitz

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